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Who cooks from scratch and how do they prepare food

Worsley,A, Wang,WC, Wijeratne,P, Ismail,S and Ridley,S 2015, Who cooks from scratch and how do they prepare food, British Food Journal, vol. 117, no. 2, pp. 664-676, doi: 10.1108/BFJ-01-2014-0018.

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Title Who cooks from scratch and how do they prepare food
Author(s) Worsley,A
Wang,WCORCID iD for Wang,WC orcid.org/0000-0003-4287-1704
Wijeratne,P
Ismail,S
Ridley,S
Journal name British Food Journal
Volume number 117
Issue number 2
Start page 664
End page 676
Total pages 13
Publisher Emerald Group Publishing
Place of publication Bingley, Eng.
Publication date 2015-02
ISSN 0007-070X
Keyword(s) Australia
Consumer
Cooking
Survey
Summary Purpose – There is increasing interest in the domestic preparation of food and with the postulated health benefits of “cooking from scratch”. The purpose of this paper is to examine the demographic and food preparation associations of this term in order to examine its operational value. Design/methodology/approach – A national online survey was conducted during 2012 in Australia among 1,023 domestic food providers, half of whom were men. Questions were asked about cooking from scratch, demographic characteristics, food preparation practices and interest in learning about cooking. Findings – Three quarters of the sample reported they often or always “cooked from scratch” (CFS). More women than men always CFS; fewer 18-29 year olds did so often or always but more of the over 50s always did so; fewer single people CFS than cohabiting people. No statistically significant ethnic, educational background or household income differences were found. High levels of cooking from scratch were associated with interest in learning more about cooking, greater use of most cooking techniques (except microwaves), meat and legume preparation techniques, and the use of broader ranges of herbs, spice, liquids/ sauces, other ingredients and cooking utensils. Research limitations/implications – In future work a numerical description of the frequency of cooking from scratch should be considered along with a wider range of response options. The data were derived from an online panel from which men were oversampled. Caution is required in comparisons between men and women respondents. The cross-sectional nature of the sample prevents any causal attributions from being drawn from the observed relationships. Further replication of the findings, especially the lack of association with educational background should be conducted. Originality/value – This is the first study to examine the associations of demographic characteristics and cooking practices with cooking from scratch. The findings suggest that cooking from scratch is common among Australian family food providers and signifies interest in learning about cooking and involvement in a wide range of cooking techniques.
Language eng
DOI 10.1108/BFJ-01-2014-0018
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Emerald Group Publishing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30070061

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.