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Therapeutic approaches to disease modifying therapy for multiple sclerosis in adults: an Australian and New Zealand perspective: part 1 historical and established therapies

Broadley,SA, Barnett,MH, Boggild,M, Brew,BJ, Butzkueven,H, Heard,R, Hodgkinson,S, Kermode,AG, Lechner-Scott,J, Macdonell,RA, Marriott,M, Mason,DF, Parratt,J, Reddel,SW, Shaw,CP, Slee,M, Spies,J, Taylor,BV, Carroll,WM, Kilpatrick,TJ, King,J, McCombe,PA, Pollard,JD and Willoughby,E 2014, Therapeutic approaches to disease modifying therapy for multiple sclerosis in adults: an Australian and New Zealand perspective: part 1 historical and established therapies, Journal of clinical neuroscience, vol. 21, no. 11, pp. 1835-1846, doi: 10.1016/j.jocn.2014.01.016.

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Title Therapeutic approaches to disease modifying therapy for multiple sclerosis in adults: an Australian and New Zealand perspective: part 1 historical and established therapies
Author(s) Broadley,SA
Barnett,MH
Boggild,M
Brew,BJ
Butzkueven,H
Heard,R
Hodgkinson,S
Kermode,AG
Lechner-Scott,J
Macdonell,RA
Marriott,M
Mason,DF
Parratt,J
Reddel,SW
Shaw,CP
Slee,M
Spies,J
Taylor,BV
Carroll,WM
Kilpatrick,TJ
King,J
McCombe,PA
Pollard,JD
Willoughby,E
Journal name Journal of clinical neuroscience
Volume number 21
Issue number 11
Start page 1835
End page 1846
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2014-11
ISSN 1532-2653
Keyword(s) Evidence-based medicine
Guideline
Multiple sclerosis
Review
Treatment
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Clinical Neurology
Neurosciences
Neurosciences & Neurology
PLACEBO-CONTROLLED TRIAL
MYELIN BASIC-PROTEIN
QUALITY-OF-LIFE
INTRAMUSCULAR INTERFERON BETA-1A
ALTERED PEPTIDE LIGAND
CENTRAL-NERVOUS-SYSTEM
LOW-DOSE NALTREXONE
PHASE-II TRIAL
DOUBLE-BLIND
GLATIRAMER ACETATE
Summary Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a potentially life-changing immune mediated disease of the central nervous system. Until recently, treatment has been largely confined to acute treatment of relapses, symptomatic therapies and rehabilitation. Through persistent efforts of dedicated physicians and scientists around the globe for 160 years, a number of therapies that have an impact on the long term outcome of the disease have emerged over the past 20 years. In this three part series we review the practicalities, benefits and potential hazards of each of the currently available and emerging treatment options for MS. We pay particular attention to ways of abrogating the risks of these therapies and provide advice on the most appropriate indications for using individual therapies. In Part 1 we review the history of the development of MS therapies and its connection with the underlying immunobiology of the disease. The established therapies for MS are reviewed in detail and their current availability and indications in Australia and New Zealand are summarised. We examine the evidence to support their use in the treatment of MS.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.jocn.2014.01.016
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30070068

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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