Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus transmission in households of infected cases : a pooled analysis of primary data from three studies across international settings

Knox,J, Van Rijen,M, Uhlemann,AC, Miller,M, Hafer,C, Vavagiakis,P, Shi,Q, Johnson,PD, Coombs,G, Kluytmans-Van Den Bergh,M, Kluytmans,J, Bennett,CM and Lowy,FD 2015, Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus transmission in households of infected cases : a pooled analysis of primary data from three studies across international settings, Epidemiology and Infection, vol. 143, no. 2, pp. 354-365, doi: 10.1017/S0950268814000983.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus transmission in households of infected cases : a pooled analysis of primary data from three studies across international settings
Author(s) Knox,J
Van Rijen,M
Uhlemann,AC
Miller,M
Hafer,C
Vavagiakis,P
Shi,Q
Johnson,PD
Coombs,G
Kluytmans-Van Den Bergh,M
Kluytmans,J
Bennett,CMORCID iD for Bennett,CM orcid.org/0000-0001-9581-1612
Lowy,FD
Journal name Epidemiology and Infection
Volume number 143
Issue number 2
Start page 354
End page 365
Total pages 12
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publication date 2015-01
ISSN 1469-4409
Keyword(s) Infectious disease epidemiology
methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA)
Staphylococcus aureus
transmission
Adolescent
Adult
Australia
Child
Child, Preschool
Community-Acquired Infections
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Netherlands
New York
Retrospective Studies
Staphylococcal Infections
Young Adult
Summary Diverse strain types of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) cause infections in community settings worldwide. To examine heterogeneity of spread within households and to identify common risk factors for household transmission across settings, primary data from studies conducted in New York (USA), Breda (The Netherlands), and Melbourne (Australia) were pooled. Following MRSA infection of the index patient, household members completed questionnaires and provided nasal swabs. Swabs positive for S. aureus were genotyped by spa sequencing. Poisson regression with robust error variance was used to estimate prevalence odds ratios for transmission of the clinical isolate to non-index household members. Great diversity of strain types existed across studies. Despite differences between studies, the index patient being colonized with the clinical isolate at the home visit (P < 0·01) and the percent of household members aged <18 years (P < 0·01) were independently associated with transmission. Targeted decolonization strategies could be used across geographical settings to limit household MRSA transmission.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S0950268814000983
Field of Research 110309 Infectious Diseases
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Cambridge University Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30070194

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Health and Social Development
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 7 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 8 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 360 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 03 Mar 2015, 13:21:02 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.