You are not logged in.

Review article: Emergency department data sharing to reduce alcohol-related violence: a systematic review of the feasibility and effectiveness of community-level interventions.

Droste, Nicolas, Miller, Peter and Baker, Tim 2014, Review article: Emergency department data sharing to reduce alcohol-related violence: a systematic review of the feasibility and effectiveness of community-level interventions., Emergency medicine Australasia, vol. 26, no. 4, pp. 326-335, doi: 10.1111/1742-6723.12247.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Review article: Emergency department data sharing to reduce alcohol-related violence: a systematic review of the feasibility and effectiveness of community-level interventions.
Author(s) Droste, Nicolas
Miller, PeterORCID iD for Miller, Peter orcid.org/0000-0002-6896-5437
Baker, TimORCID iD for Baker, Tim orcid.org/0000-0003-1893-5966
Journal name Emergency medicine Australasia
Volume number 26
Issue number 4
Start page 326
End page 335
Total pages 10
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2014-08
ISSN 1742-6723
Keyword(s) alcohol
data sharing
emergency department
injury
violence
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Emergency Medicine
PREVENTING VIOLENCE
INFORMATION
CONSUMPTION
AUSTRALIA
INJURIES
POLICE
ATTENDANCES
STRATEGIES
COUNTRIES
DRINKERS
Summary The present paper aims to review current evidence for the effectiveness and/or feasibility of using inter-agency data sharing of ED recorded assault information to direct interventions reducing alcohol-related or nightlife assaults, injury or violence. Potential data-sharing partners involve police, local council, liquor licensing regulators and venue management. A systematic review of the peer-reviewed literature was conducted. The initial search discovered 19,506 articles. After removal of duplicates and articles not meeting review criteria, n = 8 articles were included in quantitative and narrative synthesis. Seven of eight studies were conducted in UK EDs, with the remaining study presenting Australian data. All studies included in the review deemed data sharing a worthwhile pursuit. All studies attempting to measure intervention effectiveness reported substantial reductions of assaults and ED attendances post-intervention, with one reporting no change. Negative logistic feasibility concerns were minimal, with general consensus among authors being that data-sharing protocols and partnerships could be easily implemented into modern ED triage systems, with minimal cost, staff workload burden, impact to patient safety, service and anonymity, or risk of harm displacement to other licensed venues, or increase to length of patient stay. However, one study reported a potential harm displacement effect to streets surrounding intervention venues. In future, data-sharing systems should triangulate ED, police and ambulance data sources, and assess intervention effectiveness using randomised controlled trials that account for variations in venue capacity, fluctuations in ED attendance and population levels, seasonal variations in assault and injury, and control for concurrent interventions.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/1742-6723.12247
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920414 Substance Abuse
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, Wiley-Blackwell
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30070235

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
School of Medicine
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 203 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 05 Mar 2015, 09:07:25 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.