Comparative analyses of cadmium and zinc uptake correlated with changes in natural resistance-associated macrophage protein (NRAMP) expression in Solanum nigrum L. and Brassica rapa

Song,Y, Hudek,L, Freestone,D, Puhui,J, Michalczyk,AA, Senlin,Z and Ackland,ML 2014, Comparative analyses of cadmium and zinc uptake correlated with changes in natural resistance-associated macrophage protein (NRAMP) expression in Solanum nigrum L. and Brassica rapa, Environmental chemistry, vol. 11, no. 6, pp. 653-660, doi: 10.1071/EN14078.

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Title Comparative analyses of cadmium and zinc uptake correlated with changes in natural resistance-associated macrophage protein (NRAMP) expression in Solanum nigrum L. and Brassica rapa
Author(s) Song,Y
Hudek,LORCID iD for Hudek,L orcid.org/0000-0002-5722-9346
Freestone,D
Puhui,J
Michalczyk,AAORCID iD for Michalczyk,AA orcid.org/0000-0001-5716-0783
Senlin,Z
Ackland,MLORCID iD for Ackland,ML orcid.org/0000-0002-7474-6556
Journal name Environmental chemistry
Volume number 11
Issue number 6
Start page 653
End page 660
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Place of publication Clayton, Vic.
Publication date 2014-11-05
ISSN 1448-2517
Keyword(s) heavy metal
hyperaccumulator
natural resistance-associated macrophage protein (NRAMP) gene
soil contamination.
Science & Technology
Physical Sciences
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Chemistry, Analytical
Environmental Sciences
Chemistry
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
soil contamination
HYPERACCUMULATOR THLASPI-CAERULESCENS
MULTIPLE SEQUENCE ALIGNMENT
ARABIDOPSIS-HALLERI
CD-HYPERACCUMULATOR
CONTAMINATED SOILS
MANGANESE UPTAKE
IRON TRANSPORT
FAMILY
ACCUMULATION
TOLERANCE
Summary Environmental context Soils contaminated with metals can pose both environmental and human health risks. This study showed that a common crop vegetable grown in the presence of cadmium and zinc readily accumulated these metals, and thus could be a source of toxicity when eaten. The work highlights potential health risks from consuming crops grown on contaminated soils. Abstract Ingestion of plants grown in heavy metal contaminated soils can cause toxicity because of metal accumulation. We compared Cd and Zn levels in Brassica rapa, a widely grown crop vegetable, with that of the hyperaccumulator Solanum nigrum L. Solanum nigrum contained 4 times more Zn and 12 times more Cd than B. rapa, relative to dry mass. In S. nigrum Cd and Zn preferentially accumulated in the roots whereas in B. rapa Cd and Zn were concentrated more in the shoots than in the roots. The different distribution of Cd and Zn in B. rapa and S. nigrum suggests the presence of distinct metal uptake mechanisms. We correlated plant metal content with the expression of a conserved putative natural resistance-associated macrophage protein (NRAMP) metal transporter in both plants. Treatment of both plants with either Cd or Zn increased expression of the NRAMP, with expression levels being higher in the roots than in the shoots. These findings provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of heavy metal processing by S. nigrum L. and the crop vegetable B. rapa that could assist in application of these plants for phytoremediation. These investigations also highlight potential health risks associated with the consumption of crops grown on contaminated soils.
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/EN14078
Field of Research 100203 Bioremediation
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, CSIRO Publishing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30070300

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