Sympatric cryptic species in the crinoid genus Cenolia (Echinodermata: Crinoidea: Comasteridae) delineated by sequence and microsatellite markers

Naughton,KM, O'Hara,TD, Appleton,B and Gardner,MG 2014, Sympatric cryptic species in the crinoid genus Cenolia (Echinodermata: Crinoidea: Comasteridae) delineated by sequence and microsatellite markers, Molecular phylogenetics and evolution, vol. 78, no. 1, pp. 160-171, doi: 10.1016/j.ympev.2014.05.006.

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Title Sympatric cryptic species in the crinoid genus Cenolia (Echinodermata: Crinoidea: Comasteridae) delineated by sequence and microsatellite markers
Author(s) Naughton,KM
O'Hara,TD
Appleton,B
Gardner,MG
Journal name Molecular phylogenetics and evolution
Volume number 78
Issue number 1
Start page 160
End page 171
Total pages 12
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2014-09
ISSN 1055-7903
1095-9513
Keyword(s) Crinoid
Cryptic species
Microsatellite
Molecular
Phylogeny
Sympatry
Summary The marine species of the southern coast of Australia have not been well studied with regard to molecular connectivity. Cryptic species are expected to be prevalent on this coastline. Here, we investigate the crinoid genus Cenolia (Echinodermata: Crinoidea: Comasteridae) using molecular methods to elucidate cryptic species and phylogenetic relationships. The genus Cenolia dominates the southern Australian crinoid fauna in shallow waters. Few studies have examined crinoids for cryptic species at a molecular level and these have been predominantly based on mitochondrial data. We employ the nuclear markers 28S rRNA and ITS-2 in addition to the mitochondrial COI. Six divergent mitochondrial clades were identified. Gene flow between confirmed clades was subsequently examined by the use of six novel microsatellite markers, showing that sympatric taxa with low mtDNA divergences (1.7% K2P) were not interbreeding in the wild. The type specimens of Cenolia benhami and C. spanoschistum were examined, as well as all six divergent clades. Morphological characters dividing taxa were refined. Due to comb pinnule morphology, the New Zealand species benhami was determined to belong to the genus Oxycomanthus (nov. comb.). Three new species of Cenolia (including the Australian "benhami") require description. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.ympev.2014.05.006
Field of Research 060411 Population, Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics
Socio Economic Objective 960808 Marine Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30070308

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