The diet of Pacific gulls (Larus pacificus) breeding at Seal Island in northern Bass Strait

Leitch,TN, Dann,P and Arnould,JPY 2014, The diet of Pacific gulls (Larus pacificus) breeding at Seal Island in northern Bass Strait, Australian Journal of Zoology, vol. 62, no. 3, pp. 216-222, doi: 10.1071/ZO13066.

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Title The diet of Pacific gulls (Larus pacificus) breeding at Seal Island in northern Bass Strait
Author(s) Leitch,TN
Dann,P
Arnould,JPYORCID iD for Arnould,JPY orcid.org/0000-0003-1124-9330
Journal name Australian Journal of Zoology
Volume number 62
Issue number 3
Start page 216
End page 222
Total pages 7
Publisher CSIRO
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publication date 2014-06-05
ISSN 0004-959X
1446-5698
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Zoology
BLACK-BACKED GULLS
KELP GULL
COMMUNITY STRUCTURE
SEX
HABITAT
PREY
PELECANOIDES
PERFORMANCE
AUSTRALIA
ARGENTINA
Summary The endemic Pacific gull (Larus pacificus) is Australia's largest larid, and though little is currently known of its foraging ecology, its size and wide distribution suggest that it may play an important role within the marine environment. In the present study, regurgitate pellets collected from Seal Island in northern Bass Strait were used to compare intra- and interannual trends in diet composition. The main taxa identified in pellets were the common diving-petrel (Pelecanoides urinatrix), leatherjacket species (Family Monacanthidae), short-tailed shearwater (Puffinus tenuirostris) and mirror bush (Coprosma repens). Analysis of similarity (ANOSIM) identified no significant differences in numerical abundance of the dominant prey species between years, suggesting that the prey base in this region is temporally consistent or that the gulls consume low enough numbers to be unaffected by fluctuation in prey populations. Diving-petrels were consumed in consistently high numbers, suggesting the gulls may be an important predator of this species, or that the gulls are particularly skilled at foraging for them. © CSIRO 2014.
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/ZO13066
Field of Research 060201 Behavioural Ecology
060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl Marine Ichthyology)
060809 Vertebrate Biology
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, CSIRO Publishing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30070320

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