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The effect of community interventions on alcohol-related assault in Geelong, Australia

Miller, Peter, Sonderlund, Anders L., Coomber, Kerri, Palmer, Darren, Tindall, Jennifer, Gillham, Karen and Wiggers, John 2010, The effect of community interventions on alcohol-related assault in Geelong, Australia, The open criminal journal, vol. 5, pp. 8-15.

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Title The effect of community interventions on alcohol-related assault in Geelong, Australia
Author(s) Miller, PeterORCID iD for Miller, Peter orcid.org/0000-0002-6896-5437
Sonderlund, Anders L.
Coomber, Kerri
Palmer, DarrenORCID iD for Palmer, Darren orcid.org/0000-0001-6675-1155
Tindall, Jennifer
Gillham, Karen
Wiggers, John
Journal name The open criminal journal
Volume number 5
Start page 8
End page 15
Total pages 8
Publisher Bentham Science Publishers
Place of publication Hilversum, The Netherlands
Publication date 2010-11-01
ISSN 1874-9178
Summary Alcohol has consistently been demonstrated to increase levels of aggression and violence, particularly in late night licensed venues. Since 2005, the City of Geelong in Australia has implemented a substantial number of interventions to reduce alcohol related violence, including a liquor accord, increased police surveillance, ID scanners, CCTV, a radio network and an alcohol industry sponsored social marketing campaign. The aim of the current study is to assess the individual and collective impact of community interventions on indicators of alcohol-related assaults in the Geelong region. This paper reports stage one findings from the Dealing with Alcohol-related problems in the Night-time Economy project (DANTE) and specifically examines assault rate data from both emergency department presentations, ICD-10 classification codes, and police records of assaults. None of the interventions were associated with reductions in alcohol-related as-sault or intoxication in Geelong, either individually or when combined. However, the alcohol industry sponsored social marketing campaign ‘Just Think’ was associated with an increase in assault rates. Community level interventions appeared to have had little effect on assault rates during high alcohol times. It is also possible that social marketing campaigns without practical strategies are associated with increased assault rates. The findings also raise questions about whether interventions should be targeted at reducing whole-of-community alcohol consumption.
Language eng
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920414 Substance Abuse
HERDC Research category C2 Other contribution to refereed journal
Copyright notice ©2010, Bentham Science Publishers
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30070334

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.