You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Barriers and enablers to learning during team-based clinical simulations: reflective interviews with final year undergraduate nursing students

Dzioba, Jacinta, Cant, Robyn, Cooper, Simon, Bogossian, Fiona and Phillips, Nicole M. 2014, Barriers and enablers to learning during team-based clinical simulations: reflective interviews with final year undergraduate nursing students, Journal of nursing education and practice, vol. 4, no. 10, pp. 32-39, doi: 10.5430/jnep.v4n10p32.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
phillips-barriersandenablers-2014.pdf Published version application/pdf 210.79KB 117

Title Barriers and enablers to learning during team-based clinical simulations: reflective interviews with final year undergraduate nursing students
Author(s) Dzioba, Jacinta
Cant, Robyn
Cooper, Simon
Bogossian, Fiona
Phillips, Nicole M.ORCID iD for Phillips, Nicole M. orcid.org/0000-0002-6821-4983
Journal name Journal of nursing education and practice
Volume number 4
Issue number 10
Start page 32
End page 39
Total pages 8
Publisher Sciedu Press
Place of publication Toronto, Ont.
Publication date 2014-08
ISSN 1925-4040
1925-4059
Summary Background: Contemporary approaches to clinical simulation can enhance educational outcomes. However, simulation approaches do have limitations with possible compromises for learning and teaching. This paper aims to identify barriers
and enablers to learning in simulated clinical settings.
Methods: A generic qualitative design was applied. Semi-structured group video debriefing interviews were held with Australian final-year nursing students who completed three patient deterioration scenarios with a standardized patient.
Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed and analysed to identify emergent themes.
Results: Interviews with 15 teams of three students (n = 45) from three universities were analysed. Learning enablers were ‘Realism of the simulated environment’; ‘Practicing: we should do this at uni’; ‘Learning from reflection and expert feedback’, and ‘How to become competent: know the gaps’. Barriers to learning included ‘Increased stress from inexperience; ‘Expectations when pretending’ and ‘Lack of assistance’. Skills practice in team-based settings with applicable reflection and debriefing was regarded as beneficial. Simulated patients enhanced fidelity but were unable to replicate actual clinical signs. High stress levels were perceived as a barrier to learning.
Conclusions: Applicably designed high fidelity simulations with video-based reflective review offer repeated rehearsal of clinical situations to enable learning. This educational strategy may reduce the time it takes undergraduate students to
reach competency.
Language eng
DOI 10.5430/jnep.v4n10p32
Field of Research 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920210 Nursing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Sciedu Press
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30070359

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 176 Abstract Views, 118 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Sat, 07 Mar 2015, 11:41:02 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.