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Using video to promote pre-service teachers’ thinking about their transition to teaching

Ludecke,MA 2014, Using video to promote pre-service teachers’ thinking about their transition to teaching, in ATEA 2014 : Using video to promote pre-service teachers’ thinking about their transition to teaching : Proceedings of the 2014 Australian Teacher Education Association Conference, Australian Teacher Education Association, [Sydney, N.S.W.], pp. 173-185.

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Title Using video to promote pre-service teachers’ thinking about their transition to teaching
Author(s) Ludecke,MA
Conference name Australian Teacher Education Association. Conference (2014 : Sydney, New South Wales)
Conference location Sydney, New South Wales
Conference dates 2014/7/6 - 2014/7/9
Title of proceedings ATEA 2014 : Using video to promote pre-service teachers’ thinking about their transition to teaching : Proceedings of the 2014 Australian Teacher Education Association Conference
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2014
Conference series Australian Teacher Education Association Conference
Start page 173
End page 185
Total pages 13
Publisher Australian Teacher Education Association
Place of publication [Sydney, N.S.W.]
Summary This paper reports on research investigating the use of video representations of first-year teachers’ experiences in undergraduate teacher education workshops that focus on the transition to teaching. The use of the video is a responsive act that draws on the notion of looking back, where graduates in their first year of teaching ‘speak to’ current students. Scenes from video footage of the theatre-based research performance The First Time shaped workshop activities and discussions in the unit. Themes ranged from pedagogical to practical, covering topics such as teacher identity discourses; epiphanic and revelatory moments of transition to becoming a teacher; and preparing for job applications and interviews. Data from the researcher’s journal, Student Evaluation of Teaching and Units (SETU) comments, and semi-structured interviews with undergraduate students upon completion of the workshops are framed within a phenomenographic paradigm. The aim in phenomenography is to describe variations of conception that people have of a particular phenomenon (Sin, 2010), in this case the video as a tool to promote critical thinking about the transition to teaching. The researcher explored her own, and participants’ experiences, and identified a range of conceptual meanings of the phenomenon. These were classified into categories according to their similarities and differences concerning the effectiveness of this specific video in assisting undergraduates in their transition to teaching. Early results reveal some similarities and many variations among participants as to the effectiveness of the video as a tool. Their conceptions of the phenomenon are individual and relational, and as such are quite varied. Emergent varied themes include: ‘I know what it is that I need to learn’; ‘Is this theory or practice?’; and ‘I don’t do drama’. Emergent similarities include: ‘Preparing for the unexpected’.
Language eng
Field of Research 130201 Creative Arts, Media and Communication Curriculum and Pedagogy
Socio Economic Objective 930201 Pedagogy
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2015, Australian Teacher Education Association
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30070515

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Education
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.