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The propaganda strategies adopted by the Colonial British during the Malayan Emergency, 1948-1960 as applied in newspaper coverage: A case study

Bangaroo,P and Weerakkody,N 2014, The propaganda strategies adopted by the Colonial British during the Malayan Emergency, 1948-1960 as applied in newspaper coverage: A case study, in Refereed Proceedings of the Australian and New Zealand Communication Association Conference: The digital and the social: Communication for inclusion and exchange. 2014, Australian and New Zealand Communication Association (ANZCA), Online http://www.anzca.net/conferences/past-conferences/, pp. 1-22.

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Title The propaganda strategies adopted by the Colonial British during the Malayan Emergency, 1948-1960 as applied in newspaper coverage: A case study
Author(s) Bangaroo,P
Weerakkody,N
Conference name Australian an New Zealnd Communication Association (ANZCA) Annual Conference 2014.
Conference location Melbourne, VIC
Conference dates 2014/7/9 - 2014/7/11
Title of proceedings Refereed Proceedings of the Australian and New Zealand Communication Association Conference: The digital and the social: Communication for inclusion and exchange. 2014
Editor(s) Bossio,D
Publication date 2014
Start page 1
End page 22
Total pages 22
Publisher Australian and New Zealand Communication Association (ANZCA)
Place of publication Online http://www.anzca.net/conferences/past-conferences/
Keyword(s) propaganda
persuasion
newspaper coverage
Malayan insurgency
content analysis
The London Times
The Straits Times
discourses of enws
communism
race
Summary The ongoing discussions on the fluid boundaries between ‘propaganda’ and ‘persuasion’ have emerged in numerous studies, the most prominent being Jowett and O’Donnell (2006). Sharing their views, Herman and Chomsky (1988) argued on the repercussions of only using elite sources in media reports due to their capacity to mobilise the masses for a single cause and shape elite opinions, due to the absence of alternative or opposing viewpoints. This case study examined the nature of propaganda strategies adopted by the colonial British during the Malayan Emergency that proved to be highly effective. This study consisted of two separate elements. First, it extends the discussion on propaganda by examining the significance of ‘race’ used as a crucial element within the discourses of anti-communism, as a legitimate rationale to mobilise forces, primarily within a Malayan context. Second, it investigated how propaganda strategies such as the forced resettlement of the ethnic Chinese, strategies used in framing the insurgents, and psychological warfare operated as powerful mechanisms to shape propaganda communication. A comparative content analysis of two mainstream English newspapers – namely The Times (London) and Straits Times (Singapore) – was conducted to identify trends in reporting used. Juxtaposing this method was the administration of in-depth interviews with ex-service personnel who had actively served in Malaya during the Malayan Emergency. The findings of this research reveal a significant correlation between ‘race’ and the constructs of communism. The results also indicate that psychological strategies adopted by the British in the form of deeds and news production proved to be highly effective.
ISSN 1448-4331
Field of Research 200101 Communication Studies
200104 Media Studies
Socio Economic Objective 950204 The Media
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2014, ANZCA
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution share alike licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30070616

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Communication and Creative Arts
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.