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Taking the sting out of darting : Risks, restraint drugs and procedures for the chemical restraint of Southern Hemisphere otariids

Baylis,AMM, Page,B, Staniland,I, Arnould,JPY and Mckenzie,J 2015, Taking the sting out of darting : Risks, restraint drugs and procedures for the chemical restraint of Southern Hemisphere otariids, Marine Mammal Science, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 322-344, doi: 10.1111/mms.12148.

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Title Taking the sting out of darting : Risks, restraint drugs and procedures for the chemical restraint of Southern Hemisphere otariids
Author(s) Baylis,AMM
Page,B
Staniland,I
Arnould,JPYORCID iD for Arnould,JPY orcid.org/0000-0003-1124-9330
Mckenzie,J
Journal name Marine Mammal Science
Volume number 31
Issue number 1
Start page 322
End page 344
Total pages 23
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Place of publication Malden, MA
Publication date 2015-01
ISSN 0824-0469
1748-7692
Keyword(s) Anesthesia
Conservation
Ecology
Fur seal
Pinniped
Sea lion
Tagging
Telazol
Telemetry
Tranquilizer
Zoletil
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Marine & Freshwater Biology
Zoology
ARCTOCEPHALUS-PUSILLUS-DORIFERUS
CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS
FUR SEALS
TILETAMINE-ZOLAZEPAM
EUMETOPIAS-JUBATUS
FORAGING BEHAVIOR
FALKLAND ISLANDS
DELIVERY SYSTEMS
IMMOBILIZATION
Summary The need to manage otariid populations has necessitated the development of a wide range of capture methods. Chemical restraint by remote drug delivery (i.e., darting) is a highly selective method that can be used to facilitate otariid capture in a range of scenarios, when other methods may be impracticable. However, the risks associated with darting otariids are not widely known and guidelines necessary to promote and refine best practice do not exist. We review the risks associated with darting and in light of our findings, develop darting guidelines to help practitioners assess and minimize risks during capture, anesthesia and recovery. Published studies reveal that mortalities associated with darting predominantly result from complications during anesthetic maintenance (e.g., prolonged respiratory depression, apnea, or hyperthermia), rather than from complications during capture or recovery. In addition to monitoring vital signs and proper intervention, the risk of irreversible complications during anesthesia can be reduced by administering drug doses that are sufficient to enable the capture and masking of animals, after which anesthetic depth can be regulated using gas anesthesia.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/mms.12148
Field of Research 070701 Veterinary Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care
Socio Economic Objective 960802 Coastal and Estuarine Flora
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Wiley-Blackwell
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30070650

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