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Observable essential fatty acid deficiency markers and autism spectrum disorder

Brown,CM, Austin,DW and Busija,L 2014, Observable essential fatty acid deficiency markers and autism spectrum disorder, Breastfeeding Review, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 21-26.

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Title Observable essential fatty acid deficiency markers and autism spectrum disorder
Author(s) Brown,CM
Austin,DWORCID iD for Austin,DW orcid.org/0000-0002-1296-3555
Busija,L
Journal name Breastfeeding Review
Volume number 22
Issue number 2
Start page 21
End page 26
Total pages 7
Publisher Australian Breastfeeding Association
Place of publication Glen Iris, Vic.
Publication date 2014-07
ISSN 0729-2759
Keyword(s) ASD
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Breastfeeding
EFA
Essential fatty acids
FAD score
Biological Markers
Breast Feeding
Child
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive
Child, Preschool
Colostrum
Fatty Acids, Essential
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Infant, Newborn
Male
Nutritive Value
Pilot Projects
Siblings
Summary Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has been associated with essential fatty acid (EFA) deficiencies, with some researchers theorising that dysregulation of phospholipid metabolism may form part of the biological basis for ASD. This pilot study compared observable signs of fatty acid status of 19 children with an ASD diagnosis to 23 of their typically developing siblings. A pregnancy, birth and breastfeeding history was also obtained from their parents, which included a measure of infant intake of fatty acid rich colostrum immediately post-partum. When considered within their family group, those infants not breastfed (with colostrum) within the first hour of life and who had a history of fatty acid deficiency symptoms were more likely to have an ASD diagnosis. Other variables such as formula use, duration of breastfeeding, gestational age and Apgar scores were not associated with group membership. The results of this study are consistent with previous research showing a relationship between fatty acid metabolism, breastfeeding and ASD such that early infant feeding practices and the influence this has on the fatty acid metabolism of the child may be a risk factor for ASD.
Language eng
Field of Research 111403 Paediatrics
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Australian Breastfeeding Association
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30070688

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.