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Development and evaluation of a screening tool to identify people with diabetes at increased risk of medication problems relating to hypoglycaemia and medication non-adherence

Claydon-Platt,K, Manias,E and Dunning,T 2014, Development and evaluation of a screening tool to identify people with diabetes at increased risk of medication problems relating to hypoglycaemia and medication non-adherence, Contemporary Nurse, vol. 48, no. 1, pp. 10-25, doi: 10.5172/conu.2014.4714.

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Title Development and evaluation of a screening tool to identify people with diabetes at increased risk of medication problems relating to hypoglycaemia and medication non-adherence
Author(s) Claydon-Platt,K
Manias,EORCID iD for Manias,E orcid.org/0000-0002-3747-0087
Dunning,TORCID iD for Dunning,T orcid.org/0000-0002-0284-1706
Journal name Contemporary Nurse
Volume number 48
Issue number 1
Start page 10
End page 25
Total pages 34
Publisher eContent Management Pty Ltd
Place of publication Maleny, QLD
Publication date 2014-08
ISSN 1037-6178
Keyword(s) diabetes
medication safety
nursing
risk factors
screening tool
Summary Abstract Aims: To develop and evaluate a screening tool to identify people with diabetes at increased risk of medication problems relating to hypoglycaemia and medication non-adherence. Methods: A retrospective audit of attendances at a diabetes outpatient clinic at a public, teaching hospital over a 16-month period was conducted. Logistic regression was undertaken to examine risk factors associated with medication problems relating to hypoglycaemia and medication non-adherence and the most predictive set of factors comprise the Diabetes Medication Risk Screening Tool. Evaluating the tool involved assessing sensitivity and specificity, positive and negative predictive values, cut-off scores, inter-rater reliability, and content validity. Results: The Diabetes Medication Risk Screening Tool comprises seven predictive factors: age, living alone, English language, mental and behavioural problems, comorbidity index score, number of medications prescribed, and number of high-risk medications prescribed. The tool has 76.5% sensitivity, 59.5% specificity, and has a 65.1% positive predictive value, and a 71.8% negative predictive value. A score of 27 or more out of 62 was associated with high-risk of a medication problem. The inter-rater reliability of the tool was high (κ = 0.79, 95% CI 0.75 - 0.84) and the content validity index was 99.4%. Conclusion: The Diabetes Medication Risk Screening Tool has good psychometric properties and can proactively identify people with diabetes at greatest risk of medication problems relating to hypoglycaemia and medication non-adherence.
Language eng
DOI 10.5172/conu.2014.4714
Field of Research 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920104 Diabetes
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, eContent Management Pty Ltd
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30070713

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.