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Bone strength and density via pQCT in post-menopausal osteopenic women after 9 months resistive exercise with whole body vibration or proprioceptive exercise

Stolzenberg, N., Belavý, D.L., Beller, G., Armbrecht, G., Semler, J. and Felsenberg, D. 2013, Bone strength and density via pQCT in post-menopausal osteopenic women after 9 months resistive exercise with whole body vibration or proprioceptive exercise, Journal of musculoskeletal and neuronal interactions, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 66-76.

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Title Bone strength and density via pQCT in post-menopausal osteopenic women after 9 months resistive exercise with whole body vibration or proprioceptive exercise
Author(s) Stolzenberg, N.
Belavý, D.L.ORCID iD for Belavý, D.L. orcid.org/0000-0002-9307-832X
Beller, G.
Armbrecht, G.
Semler, J.
Felsenberg, D.
Journal name Journal of musculoskeletal and neuronal interactions
Volume number 13
Issue number 1
Start page 66
End page 76
Total pages 11
Publisher International Society of Musculoskeletal and Neuronal Interactions
Place of publication Kifissia, Greece
Publication date 2013-03
ISSN 1108-7161
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Neurosciences
Physiology
Neurosciences & Neurology
Elderly
Osteopenia
Weight Training
Vibration Exercise
MINERAL DENSITY
MUSCLE STRENGTH
OLDER-ADULTS
HIGH-INTENSITY
HIP FRACTURE
OSTEOPOROSIS
SARCOPENIA
THERAPY
TRIAL
MASS
Summary OBJECTIVES: In order to better understand which training approaches are more effective for preventing bone loss in post-menopausal women with low bone mass, we examined the effect of a nine-month resistive exercise program with either an additional whole body vibration exercise (VIB) or balance training (BAL). METHODS: 68 post-menopausal women with osteopenia were recruited for the study and were randomised to either the VIB or BAL group. Two training sessions per week were performed. 57 subjects completed the study (VIB n=26; BAL n=31). Peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) measurements of the tibia, fibula, radius and ulna were performed at baseline and at the end of the intervention period at the epiphysis (4% site) and diaphysis (66% site). Analysis was done on an intent-to-treat approach. RESULTS: Significant increases in bone density and strength were seen at a number of measurement sites after the intervention period. No significant differences were seen in the response of the two groups at the lower-leg. CONCLUSIONS: This study provided evidence that a twice weekly resistive exercise program with either additional balance or vibration training could increase bone density at the distal tibia after a nine-month intervention period in post-menopausal women with low bone mass.
Language eng
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920299 Health and Support Services not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2013, International Society of Musculoskeletal and Neuronal Interactions
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30071014

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.