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Countermeasures against lumbar spine deconditioning in prolonged bed rest: resistive exercise with and without whole body vibration

Belavý, Daniel L., Armbrecht, Gabriele, Gast, Ulf, Richardson, Carolyn A., Hides, Julie A. and Felsenberg, Dieter 2010, Countermeasures against lumbar spine deconditioning in prolonged bed rest: resistive exercise with and without whole body vibration, Journal of applied physiology, vol. 109, no. 6, pp. 1801-1811, doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00707.2010.

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Title Countermeasures against lumbar spine deconditioning in prolonged bed rest: resistive exercise with and without whole body vibration
Author(s) Belavý, Daniel L.ORCID iD for Belavý, Daniel L. orcid.org/0000-0002-9307-832X
Armbrecht, Gabriele
Gast, Ulf
Richardson, Carolyn A.
Hides, Julie A.
Felsenberg, Dieter
Journal name Journal of applied physiology
Volume number 109
Issue number 6
Start page 1801
End page 1811
Total pages 11
Publisher American Physiological Society
Place of publication Bethesada, Md.
Publication date 2010-12
ISSN 1522-1601
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Physiology
Sport Sciences
microgravity
spaceflight
countermeasures
intervertebral disk
RESISTANCE EXERCISE
MUSCLE ATROPHY
BONE LOSS
TENDON VIBRATION
BACK-PAIN
COMPRESSION
PAMIDRONATE
Summary To evaluate the effect of short-duration, high-load resistive exercise, with and without whole body vibration on lumbar muscle size, intervertebral disk and spinal morphology changes, and low back pain (LBP) incidence during prolonged bed rest, 24 subjects underwent 60 days of head-down tilt bed rest and performed either resistive vibration exercise (n = 7), resistive exercise only (n = 8), or no exercise (n = 9; 2nd Berlin Bed-Rest Study). Discal and spinal shape was measured from sagittal plane magnetic resonance images. Cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of the multifidus, erector spinae, quadratus lumborum, and psoas were measured on para-axial magnetic resonance images. LBP incidence was assessed with questionnaires at regular intervals. The countermeasures reduced CSA loss in the multifidus, lumbar erector spinae and quadratus lumborum muscles, with greater increases in psoas muscle CSA seen in the countermeasure groups (P ≤ 0.004). There was little statistical evidence for an additional effect of whole body vibration above resistive exercise alone on these muscle changes. Exercise subjects reported LBP more frequently in the first week of bed rest, but this was only significant in resistive exercise only (P = 0.011 vs. control, resistive vibration exercise vs. control: P = 0.56). No effect of the countermeasures on changes in spinal morphology was seen (P ≥ 0.22). The results suggest that high-load resistive exercise, with or without whole body vibration, performed 3 days/wk can reduce lumbar muscle atrophy, but further countermeasure optimization is required.
Language eng
DOI 10.1152/japplphysiol.00707.2010
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920299 Health and Support Services not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2010, American Physiological Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30071020

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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