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Progressive adaptation in physical activity and neuromuscular performance during 520d confinement

Belavý, Daniel L., Gast, Ulf, Daumer, Martin, Fomina, Elena, Rawer, Rainer, Schießl, Hans, Schneider, Stefan, Schubert, Harald, Soaz, Cristina and Felsenberg, Dieter 2013, Progressive adaptation in physical activity and neuromuscular performance during 520d confinement, PLoS one, vol. 8, no. 3, Article Number : e60090, pp. 1-7, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0060090.

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Title Progressive adaptation in physical activity and neuromuscular performance during 520d confinement
Author(s) Belavý, Daniel L.ORCID iD for Belavý, Daniel L. orcid.org/0000-0002-9307-832X
Gast, Ulf
Daumer, Martin
Fomina, Elena
Rawer, Rainer
Schießl, Hans
Schneider, Stefan
Schubert, Harald
Soaz, Cristina
Felsenberg, Dieter
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 8
Issue number 3
Season Article Number : e60090
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher PLoS
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2013
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
OXIDATIVE STRESS
JUMPING POWER
MUSCLE
BONE
DECLINE
MEN
AGE
Summary To understand whether prolonged confinement results in reductions in physical activity and adaptation in the musculoskeletal system, six subjects were measured during 520 d isolation in the Mars500 study. We tested the hypothesis that physical activity reduces in prolonged confinement and that this would be associated with decrements of neuromuscular performance. Physical activity, as measured by average acceleration of the body's center of mass ("activity temperature") using the actibelt® device, decreased progressively over the course of isolation (p<0.00001). Concurrently, countermovement jump power and single-leg hop force decreased during isolation (p<0.001) whilst grip force did not change (p≥0.14). Similar to other models of inactivity, greater decrements of neuromuscular performance occurred in the lower-limb than in the upper-limb. Subject motivational state increased non-significantly (p = 0.20) during isolation, suggesting reductions in lower-limb neuromuscular performance were unrelated to motivation. Overall, we conclude that prolonged confinement is a form of physical inactivity and is associated with adaptation in the neuromuscular system.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0060090
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920299 Health and Support Services not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2013, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30071048

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.