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Whole-body vibration versus proprioceptive training on postural control in post-menopausal osteopenic women

Stolzenberg, Nils, Belavý, Daniel L., Rawer, Rainer and Felsenberg, Dieter 2013, Whole-body vibration versus proprioceptive training on postural control in post-menopausal osteopenic women, Gait & posture, vol. 38, no. 3, pp. 416-420, doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2013.01.002.

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Title Whole-body vibration versus proprioceptive training on postural control in post-menopausal osteopenic women
Author(s) Stolzenberg, Nils
Belavý, Daniel L.ORCID iD for Belavý, Daniel L. orcid.org/0000-0002-9307-832X
Rawer, Rainer
Felsenberg, Dieter
Journal name Gait & posture
Volume number 38
Issue number 3
Start page 416
End page 420
Total pages 5
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2013-07
ISSN 1879-2219
Keyword(s) Galileo whole body vibration exercise
Leonardo Mechanography
Postmenopausal osteoporosis balance exercise
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Neurosciences
Orthopedics
Sport Sciences
Neurosciences & Neurology
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
OLDER-ADULTS
STRENGTH
EXERCISE
BALANCE
FALLS
PROGRAM
PEOPLE
Summary BACKGROUND: To prevent falls in the elderly, especially those with low bone density, is it necessary to maintain muscle coordination and balance. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of classical balance training (BAL) and whole-body vibration training (VIB) on postural control in post-menopausal women with low bone density. METHODS: Sixty-eight subjects began the study and 57 completed the nine-month intervention program. All subjects performed resistive exercise and were randomized to either the BAL- (N=31) or VIB-group (N=26). The BAL-group performed progressive balance and coordination training and the VIB-group underwent, in total, four minutes of vibration (depending on exercise; 24-26Hz and 4-8mm range) on the Galileo Fitness. Every month, the performance of a single leg stance task on a standard unstable surface (Posturomed) was tested. At baseline and end of the study only, single leg stance, Romberg-stance, semi-tandem-stance and tandem-stance were tested on a ground reaction force platform (Leonardo). RESULTS: The velocity of movement on the Posturomed improved by 28.3 (36.1%) (p<0.001) in the VIB-group and 18.5 (31.5%) (p<0.001) in the BAL-group by the end of the nine-month intervention period, but no differences were seen between the two groups (p=0.45). Balance tests performed on the Leonardo device did not show any significantly different responses between the two groups after nine months (p≥0.09). CONCLUSIONS: Strength training combined with either proprioceptive training or whole-body vibration was associated with improvements in some, but not all, measures of postural control in post-menopausal women with low bone density. The current study could not provide evidence for a significantly different impact of whole-body vibration or balance training on postural control.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2013.01.002
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920299 Health and Support Services not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2013, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30071071

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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