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Social competence following pediatric stroke: contributions of brain insult and family environment

Anderson,V, Gomes,A, Greenham,M, Hearps,S, Gordon,A, Rinehart,N, Gonzalez,L, Yeates,KO, Hajek,CA, Lo,W and Mackay,M 2014, Social competence following pediatric stroke: contributions of brain insult and family environment, Social neuroscience, vol. 9, no. 5, pp. 471-483, doi: 10.1080/17470919.2014.932308.

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Title Social competence following pediatric stroke: contributions of brain insult and family environment
Author(s) Anderson,V
Gomes,A
Greenham,M
Hearps,S
Gordon,A
Rinehart,NORCID iD for Rinehart,N orcid.org/0000-0001-6109-3958
Gonzalez,L
Yeates,KO
Hajek,CA
Lo,W
Mackay,M
Journal name Social neuroscience
Volume number 9
Issue number 5
Start page 471
End page 483
Publisher Routledge (Taylor and Francis)
Place of publication Abingdon, England
Publication date 2014
ISSN 1747-0919
1747-0927
Keyword(s) Brain
Child stroke
Family
Pediatric stroke
Recovery
Social function
Science & Technology
Social Sciences
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Neurosciences
Psychology
Neurosciences & Neurology
ARTERIAL ISCHEMIC-STROKE
QUALITY-OF-LIFE
LESION LOCATION
PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS
SINOVENOUS THROMBOSIS
CHILDHOOD STROKE
RISK-FACTORS
HEAD-INJURY
CHILDREN
AGE
Summary Limited information is available regarding predictors of psychosocial difficulties in children following stroke. This study aimed to (i) compare social competence of children with arterial ischemic stroke (AIS) to those with chronic illness and healthy controls and (ii) investigate the contribution of stroke pathology, neurological outcome and environment. Thirty-six children with AIS > 12 months prior to recruitment were compared with children with chronic illness (asthma) (n = 15) and healthy controls (n = 43). Children underwent intellectual assessment, and children and parents completed questionnaires to assess social competence. Children with AIS underwent MRI scan and neurological evaluation. Child AIS was associated with poorer social adjustment and participation, and children with AIS were rated as having more social problems than controls. Lesion volume was not associated with social outcome, but subcortical stroke was linked to reduced social participation and younger stroke onset predicted better social interaction and higher self-esteem. Family function was the sole predictor of social adjustment. Findings highlight the risk of social impairment following pediatric stroke, with both stroke and environmental factors influencing children's social competence in the chronic stages of recovery. They indicate the potential for intervention targeting support at the family level.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/17470919.2014.932308
Field of Research 170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30071077

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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