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Individual (co)variation in standard metabolic rate, feeding rate, and exploratory behavior in wild-caught semiaquatic salamanders

Gifford,ME, Clay,TA and Careau,V 2014, Individual (co)variation in standard metabolic rate, feeding rate, and exploratory behavior in wild-caught semiaquatic salamanders, Physiological and biochemical zoology, vol. 87, no. 3, pp. 384-396, doi: 10.1086/675974.

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Title Individual (co)variation in standard metabolic rate, feeding rate, and exploratory behavior in wild-caught semiaquatic salamanders
Author(s) Gifford,ME
Clay,TA
Careau,V
Journal name Physiological and biochemical zoology
Volume number 87
Issue number 3
Start page 384
End page 396
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Place of publication Chicago, IL
Publication date 2014-05
ISSN 1537-5293
1522-2152
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Physiology
Zoology
LONG-TERM REPEATABILITY
TITS PARUS-MAJOR
ANIMAL PERSONALITY
AEROBIC PERFORMANCE
MAXIMUM-LIKELIHOOD
EASTERN CHIPMUNKS
NATURAL-SELECTION
POPULATION-LEVEL
TAMIAS-STRIATUS
HERITABILITY
Summary Repeatability is an important concept in evolutionary analyses because it provides information regarding the benefit of repeated measurements and, in most cases, a putative upper limit to heritability estimates. Repeatability (R) of different aspects of energy metabolism and behavior has been demonstrated in a variety of organisms over short and long time intervals. Recent research suggests that consistent individual differences in behavior and energy metabolism might covary. Here we present new data on the repeatability of body mass, standard metabolic rate (SMR), voluntary exploratory behavior, and feeding rate in a semiaquatic salamander and ask whether individual variation in behavioral traits is correlated with individual variation in metabolism on a whole-animal basis and after conditioning on body mass. All measured traits were repeatable, but the repeatability estimates ranged from very high for body mass (R = 0.98), to intermediate for SMR (R = 0.39) and food intake (R = 0.58), to low for exploratory behavior (R = 0.25). Moreover, repeatability estimates for all traits except body mass declined over time (i.e., from 3 to 9 wk), although this pattern could be a consequence of the relatively low sample size used in this study. Despite significant repeatability in all traits, we find little evidence that behaviors are correlated with SMR at the phenotypic and among-individual levels when conditioned on body mass. Specifically, the phenotypic correlations between SMR and exploratory behavior were negative in all trials but significantly so in one trial only. Salamanders in this study showed individual variation in how their exploratory behavior changed across trials (but not body mass, SMR, and feed intake), which might have contributed to observed changing correlations across trials.
Language eng
DOI 10.1086/675974
Field of Research 060201 Behavioural Ecology
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, University of Chicago Press
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30071532

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.