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The four national taps of Singapore: a holistic approach to water resources management from drainage to drinking water

Irvine, Kim, Chua, Lloyd and Eikass, Hans S. 2014, The four national taps of Singapore: a holistic approach to water resources management from drainage to drinking water, Journal of water management modeling, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.14796/JWMM.C375.

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Title The four national taps of Singapore: a holistic approach to water resources management from drainage to drinking water
Author(s) Irvine, Kim
Chua, LloydORCID iD for Chua, Lloyd orcid.org/0000-0003-2523-3735
Eikass, Hans S.
Journal name Journal of water management modeling
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Computational Hydraulics International (CHI)
Place of publication Guelph, Ont.
Publication date 2014
ISSN 2292-6062
Summary  Water resources in Singapore are managed following the principles of a closed loop hydrologic cycle by one agency, the Public Utility Board (PUB), which promotes its management philosophy through the Four National Taps of Singapore program. The four national taps are: water from local catchment areas; imported water (from Malaysia); reused water (known as NEWater); and desalinated water. Given the uncertainty of water imports, the remaining three national taps have become increasingly important and this paper begins with a general overview of the innovative programs implemented by PUB in support of these three taps. Stormwater runoff is captured from two-thirds of Singapore’s land area and stored in reservoirs for subsequent use. Stormwater management is an important component of the catchment area tap and extensive low impact development (LID) implementation has become a priority through the ABC (Active, Beautiful, Clean) Waters Program. Examples of several ABC Waters projects are discussed. NEWater currently supplies 30% of the country’s demand and this is projected to increase to 50% by 2060. NEWater plants take treated wastewater through the additional steps of microfiltration, reverse osmosis and ultraviolet treatment for use primarily in industry, although a portion also is blended into the municipal reservoirs. Singapore’s single desalination plant currently meets 10% of its demand, with a second plant to be completed in 2013 that will more than double production. Also discussed are the results of recently completed pilot projects related to stormwater management including testing of E. coli in runoff from high density residential areas, a blind taste test and survey on acceptance of NEWater, and a survey of Singaporean understanding about stormwater management issues.Water resources in Singapore are managed following the principles of a closed loop hydrologic cycle by one agency, the Public Utility Board (PUB), which promotes its management philosophy through the Four National Taps of Singapore program. The four national taps are: water from local catchment areas; imported water (from Malaysia); reused water (known as NEWater); and desalinated water. Given the uncertainty of water imports, the remaining three national taps have become increasingly important and this paper begins with a general overview of the innovative programs implemented by PUB in support of these three taps. Stormwater runoff is captured from two-thirds of Singapore’s land area and stored in reservoirs for subsequent use. Stormwater management is an important component of the catchment area tap and extensive low impact development (LID) implementation has become a priority through the ABC (Active, Beautiful, Clean) Waters Program. Examples of several ABC Waters projects are discussed. NEWater currently supplies 30% of the country’s demand and this is projected to increase to 50% by 2060. NEWater plants take treated wastewater through the additional steps of microfiltration, reverse osmosis and ultraviolet treatment for use primarily in industry, although a portion also is blended into the municipal reservoirs. Singapore’s single desalination plant currently meets 10% of its demand, with a second plant to be completed in 2013 that will more than double production. Also discussed are the results of recently completed pilot projects related to stormwater management including testing of E. coli in runoff from high density residential areas, a blind taste test and survey on acceptance of NEWater, and a survey of Singaporean understanding about stormwater management issues.
Language eng
DOI 10.14796/JWMM.C375
Field of Research 059999 Environmental Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Computational Hydraulics International (CHI)
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30071550

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Engineering
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.