Trends in body mass index according to educational attainment for urban Australian adults between 1980 and 2007

Gearon, E., Backholer, K., Stevenson, C., Magliano, D.J., Keating, C., Ball, K., Beauchamp, A. and Peeters, A. 2015, Trends in body mass index according to educational attainment for urban Australian adults between 1980 and 2007, International journal of obesity, vol. 39, pp. 1019-1026, doi: 10.1038/ijo.2015.27.

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Title Trends in body mass index according to educational attainment for urban Australian adults between 1980 and 2007
Author(s) Gearon, E.
Backholer, K.ORCID iD for Backholer, K. orcid.org/0000-0002-3323-575X
Stevenson, C.ORCID iD for Stevenson, C. orcid.org/0000-0003-4026-5719
Magliano, D.J.
Keating, C.
Ball, K.ORCID iD for Ball, K. orcid.org/0000-0003-2893-8415
Beauchamp, A.ORCID iD for Beauchamp, A. orcid.org/0000-0001-6555-6200
Peeters, A.ORCID iD for Peeters, A. orcid.org/0000-0003-4340-9132
Journal name International journal of obesity
Volume number 39
Start page 1019
End page 1026
Total pages 8
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1476-5497
Summary BackgroundWe have previously demonstrated that between the years 1980 and 2000, the mean body mass index (BMI) of the urban Australian population increased, with greater increases observed with increasing BMI. The current study aimed to quantify trends over time in BMI according to education between 1980 and 2007.MethodsWe compared data from the 1980, 1983 and 1989 National Heart Foundation Risk Factor Prevalence Studies, 1995 National Nutrition Survey, 2000 Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study and the 2007 National Health Survey. For survey comparability, analyses were restricted to urban Australian residents aged 25-64 years. BMI was calculated from measured height and weight. The education variable was dichotomised at completion of secondary school. Four age-standardised BMI indicators were compared over time by sex and education: mean BMI, mean BMI of the top five percent of the BMI distribution, prevalence of obesity (BMI⩾30 kg/m(2)), prevalence of class II(+) obesity (BMI⩾35 kg/m(2)).ResultsBetween 1980 and 2007, the mean BMI among men increased by 2.5 kg/m(2) and 1.7 kg/m(2) for those with low and high education levels, respectively, corresponding to increases in obesity prevalence of 20(from 12% to 32%) and 11(10% to 21%) %-points. Among women mean BMI increased by 2.9 kg/m(2) and 2.4 kg/m(2) for those with low and high education levels respectively, corresponding to increases in obesity prevalence of 16(12% to 28%) and 12(7% to 19%) %-points. The prevalence of class II(+) obesity among men increased by 9(1% to 10%) and 4(1% to 5%) %-points for those with low and high education levels, and among women increased by 8(4% to 12%) and 4(2% to 6%) %-points. Absolute and relative differences between education groups generally increased over time.ConclusionsEducational differences in BMI have persisted among urban Australian adults since 1980 without improvement. Obesity prevention policies will need to be effective in those with greatest socio-economic disadvantage if we are to equitably and effectively address the population burden of obesity and its corollaries.International Journal of Obesity accepted article preview online, 16 March 2015. doi:10.1038/ijo.2015.27.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/ijo.2015.27
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Nature Publishing Group
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30071577

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