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Visual effects in great bowerbird sexual displays and their implications for signal design

Endler,JA, Gaburro,J and Kelley,LA 2014, Visual effects in great bowerbird sexual displays and their implications for signal design, Proceedings of The Royal Society B, vol. 281, no. 1783, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1098/rspb.2014.0235.

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Title Visual effects in great bowerbird sexual displays and their implications for signal design
Author(s) Endler,JAORCID iD for Endler,JA orcid.org/0000-0002-7557-7627
Gaburro,J
Kelley,LA
Journal name Proceedings of The Royal Society B
Volume number 281
Issue number 1783
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Royal Society Publishing
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2014-05-22
ISSN 1471-2954
Keyword(s) bowerbird
constraints
holding attention
illusions
sexual display
visual effects
Animal Communication
Animals
Color Perception
Courtship
Female
Male
Mating Preference, Animal
Sexual Behavior, Animal
Songbirds
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Biology
Ecology
Evolutionary Biology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine - Other Topics
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
CHROMATIC ADAPTATION
SATIN BOWERBIRDS
MATING SUCCESS
TIME-COURSE
FEMALE PREFERENCES
SPOTTED BOWERBIRD
COLOR APPEARANCE
MATE CHOICE
MALE TRAITS
DECORATIONS
Summary It is often assumed that the primary purpose of a male's sexual display is to provide information about quality, or to strongly stimulate prospective mates, but other functions of courtship displays have been relatively neglected. Male great bowerbirds (Ptilonorhynchus nuchalis) construct bowers that exploit the female's predictable field of view (FOV) during courtship displays by creating forced perspective illusions, and the quality of illusion is a good predictor of mating success. Here, we present and discuss two additional components of male courtship displays that use the female's predetermined viewpoint: (i) the rapid and diverse flashing of coloured objects within her FOV and (ii) chromatic adaptation of the female's eyes that alters her perception of the colour of the displayed objects. Neither is directly related to mating success, but both are likely to increase signal efficacy, and may also be associated with attracting and holding the female's attention. Signal efficacy is constrained by trade-offs between the signal components; there are both positive and negative interactions within multicomponent signals. Important signal components may have a threshold effect on fitness rather than the often assumed linear relationship.
Language eng
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2014.0235
Field of Research 060399 Evolutionary Biology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Grant ID DP110010421
Copyright notice ©2014, Royal Society Publishing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30071588

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