Looking outside: What can be learnt from computing education around the world?

Craig,A, Lang,C, Giannakos,MN, Kleiner,C and Gal-Ezer,J 2014, Looking outside: What can be learnt from computing education around the world?, in SIGCSE 2014 - Proceedings of the 45th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, ACM - Association for Computing Machinery, [Atlanta, Georgia], pp. 371-372, doi: 10.1145/2538862.2538871.

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Title Looking outside: What can be learnt from computing education around the world?
Author(s) Craig,AORCID iD for Craig,A orcid.org/0000-0003-4295-7428
Lang,C
Giannakos,MN
Kleiner,C
Gal-Ezer,J
Conference name ACM technical symposium on Computer science education (45th : 2014 : Atlanta, Georgia)
Conference location Atlanta, Georgia
Conference dates 2014/3/5 - 2014/3/8
Title of proceedings SIGCSE 2014 - Proceedings of the 45th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education
Publication date 2014
Start page 371
End page 372
Total pages 2
Publisher ACM - Association for Computing Machinery
Place of publication [Atlanta, Georgia]
Keyword(s) International computer education
Summary There is a growing awareness of the importance of including computing education in the curriculum of secondary schools in countries like the United States of America, the United Kingdom, New Zealand, and South Korea. Consequently, we have seen serious efforts to introduce computing education to the core curriculum and/or to improve it. Recent reports (such as Wilson et al. 2010; Hubwieser et al. 2011) reveal that computing education faces problems regarding its lack of exposure as well as a lack of motivators for students to follow this line of study. Although students use computers for many tasks both at home and at school, many of them never quite understand what computer science is and how it relates to algorithmic thinking and problem solving. This panel will bring together leaders in computing education from Australia, Germany, Greece, Israel and Norway to describe the state of computing education in each of their countries. Issues raised will include how high school computer education is conducted in that country, how teachers are skilled /accredited, the challenges that are being faced today and how these challenges are being addressed. Panellists will suggest lessons other countries may find of value from their way of doing things. An important issue is how to recruit female students in to computer education at high school level and how to encourage them to continue in the discipline to university. The problem is exacerbated because computer education is still not included as a compulsory subject in the regular curriculum of high schools in all of these countries.
ISBN 9781450326056
Language eng
DOI 10.1145/2538862.2538871
Field of Research 0 Not Applicable
Socio Economic Objective 0 Not Applicable
HERDC Research category E3 Extract of paper
Copyright notice ©2014, ACM
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30071604

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Information and Business Analytics
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