The influence of mindfulness meditation on angry emotions and violent behavior on Thai technical college students

Wongtongkam, Nualnong, Day, Andrew, Ward, Paul Russell and Winefield, Anthony Harold 2015, The influence of mindfulness meditation on angry emotions and violent behavior on Thai technical college students, European journal of integrative medicine, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 124-130, doi: 10.1016/j.eujim.2014.10.007.

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Title The influence of mindfulness meditation on angry emotions and violent behavior on Thai technical college students
Author(s) Wongtongkam, Nualnong
Day, Andrew
Ward, Paul Russell
Winefield, Anthony Harold
Journal name European journal of integrative medicine
Volume number 7
Issue number 2
Start page 124
End page 130
Total pages 7
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2015-04
ISSN 1876-3820
1876-3839
Keyword(s) Anger
Mindfulness meditation
Technical college
Thailand
Summary Introduction: Violence among technical college students is a significant issue in Thailand, South East Asia, and yet few interventions are available for use with this group. In this study the outcomes of a culturally appropriate intervention, mindfulness meditation (MM), on anger and violent behavior are reported. The MM intervention was delivered over three consecutive weeks to technical college students (n = 40) and the effects compared to a comparison group (n = 56) who attend classes as usual. Methods: Both the intervention and comparison group completed a series of validated self-report measures on aggressive and violent behavior perpetration and victimization on three occasions (pre-intervention, 1 month and 3 month post-intervention). Results: Program participants reported lower levels of anger expression at one month follow-up, but there were no observed group. ×. time interactions for self-reported violent behavior. Rates of victimization changed over time, with one interaction effect observed for reports of being threatened. Conclusions: MM may have the potential to improve emotional self-control, but is likely to only impact on violent behavior when this is anger mediated.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.eujim.2014.10.007
Field of Research 170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30071612

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
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