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Understanding evidence: a statewide survey to explore evidence-informed public health decision-making in a local government setting

Armstrong,R, Waters,E, Moore,L, Dobbins,M, Pettman,T, Burns,C, Swinburn,B, Anderson,L and Petticrew,M 2014, Understanding evidence: a statewide survey to explore evidence-informed public health decision-making in a local government setting, Implementation science, vol. 9, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1186/s13012-014-0188-7.

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Title Understanding evidence: a statewide survey to explore evidence-informed public health decision-making in a local government setting
Author(s) Armstrong,R
Waters,E
Moore,L
Dobbins,M
Pettman,T
Burns,C
Swinburn,B
Anderson,L
Petticrew,M
Journal name Implementation science
Volume number 9
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2014-12-14
ISSN 1748-5908
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Health Care Sciences & Services
Health Policy & Services
KNOWLEDGE TRANSLATION STRATEGIES
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
POLICY
EXCHANGE
ORGANIZATIONS
DIFFUSION
PROMOTION
CAPACITY
SUPPORT
MAKERS
Summary  Background: The value placed on types of evidence within decision-making contexts is highly dependent on individuals, the organizations in which the work and the systems and sectors they operate in. Decision-making processes too are highly contextual. Understanding the values placed on evidence and processes guiding decision-making is crucial to designing strategies to support evidence-informed decision-making (EIDM). This paper describes how evidence is used to inform local government (LG) public health decisions.
Methods: The study used mixed methods including a cross-sectional survey and interviews. The Evidence-Informed Decision-Making Tool (EvIDenT) survey was designed to assess three key domains likely to impact on EIDM: access, confidence, and organizational culture. Other elements included the usefulness and influence of sources of evidence (people/groups and resources), skills and barriers, and facilitators to EIDM. Forty-five LGs from Victoria, Australia agreed to participate in the survey and up to four people from each organization were invited to complete the survey (n = 175). To further explore definitions of evidence and generate experiential data on EIDM practice, key informant interviews were conducted with a range of LG employees working in areas relevant to public health.
Results: In total, 135 responses were received (75% response rate) and 13 interviews were conducted. Analysis revealed varying levels of access, confidence and organizational culture to support EIDM. Significant relationships were found between domains: confidence, culture and access to research evidence. Some forms of evidence (e.g. community views) appeared to be used more commonly and at the expense of others (e.g. research evidence). Overall, a mixture of evidence (but more internal than external evidence) was influential in public health decision-making in councils. By comparison, a mixture of evidence (but more external than internal evidence) was deemed to be useful in public health decision-making.
Conclusions: This study makes an important contribution to understanding how evidence is used within the public health LG context.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s13012-014-0188-7
Field of Research 111708 Health and Community Services
Socio Economic Objective 920599 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, BioMed Central
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30071614

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.