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A metasynthesis of patient-provider communication in hospital for patients with severe communication disabilities: informing new translational research

Hemsley,B and Balandin,S 2014, A metasynthesis of patient-provider communication in hospital for patients with severe communication disabilities: informing new translational research, Augmentative and alternative communication, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 329-343, doi: 10.3109/07434618.2014.955614.

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Title A metasynthesis of patient-provider communication in hospital for patients with severe communication disabilities: informing new translational research
Author(s) Hemsley,B
Balandin,SORCID iD for Balandin,S orcid.org/0000-0003-4765-8232
Journal name Augmentative and alternative communication
Volume number 30
Issue number 4
Start page 329
End page 343
Publisher Informa Healthcare
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2014-12
ISSN 0743-4618
1477-3848
Keyword(s) Augmentative and alternative communication
Communication disability
Complex communication needs
Metasynthesis
Patient care
Patient safety
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Audiology & Speech-Language Pathology
Rehabilitation
HEALTH-CARE PROVIDERS
OF-THE-LITERATURE
CEREBRAL-PALSY
COMPLEX COMMUNICATION
INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES
ENVIRONMENTAL-FACTORS
INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFICATION
DEVELOPMENTAL-DISABILITY
SUPPORTING ADULTS
ADVERSE EVENTS
Summary Poor patient-provider communication in hospital continues to be cited as a possible causal factor in preventable adverse events for patients with severe communication disabilities. Yet to date there are no reports of empirical interventions that investigate or demonstrate an improvement in communication in hospital for these patients. The aim of this review was to synthesize the findings of research into communication in hospital for people with severe communication disabilities arising from lifelong and acquired stable conditions including cerebral palsy, autism, intellectual disability, aphasia following stroke, but excluding progressive conditions and those solely related to sensory impairments of hearing or vision. Results revealed six core strategies suggested to improve communication in hospital: (a) develop services, systems, and policies that support improved communication, (b) devote enough time to communication, (c) ensure adequate access to communication tools (nurse call systems and communication aids), (d) access personally held written health information, (e) collaborate effectively with carers, spouses, and parents, and (f) increase the communicative competence of hospital staff. Currently there are no reports that trial or validate any of these strategies specifically in hospital settings. Observational and evaluative research is needed to investigate the ecological validity of strategies proposed to improve communication.
Language eng
DOI 10.3109/07434618.2014.955614
Field of Research 111703 Care for Disabled
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Informa Healthcare
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30071728

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.