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Granitic coastal geomorphology: Applying integrated terrestrial and bathymetric LiDAR with multibeam sonar to examine coastal landscape evolution

Kennedy,DM, Ierodiaconou,D and Schimel,A 2014, Granitic coastal geomorphology: Applying integrated terrestrial and bathymetric LiDAR with multibeam sonar to examine coastal landscape evolution, Earth surface processes and landforms, vol. 39, no. 12, pp. 1663-1674, doi: 10.1002/esp.3615.

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Title Granitic coastal geomorphology: Applying integrated terrestrial and bathymetric LiDAR with multibeam sonar to examine coastal landscape evolution
Author(s) Kennedy,DM
Ierodiaconou,DORCID iD for Ierodiaconou,D orcid.org/0000-0002-7832-4801
Schimel,A
Journal name Earth surface processes and landforms
Volume number 39
Issue number 12
Start page 1663
End page 1674
Total pages 12
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2014
ISSN 0197-9337
1096-9837
Keyword(s) Cliff
Granite
Joint
LiDAR
Multibeam
Rocky coast
Sea level
Shore platform
Science & Technology
Physical Sciences
Geography, Physical
Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Physical Geography
Geology
SHORE PLATFORMS
NORTHWESTERN SPAIN
LATE PLEISTOCENE
EROSION
AUSTRALIA
EXAMPLE
GALICIA
DESERT
Summary Coasts composed of resistant lithologies such as granite are generally highly resistant to erosion. They tend to evolve over multiple sea level cycles with highstands acting to remove subaerially weathered material. This often results in a landscape dominated by plunging cliffs with shore platforms rarely occurring. The long-term evolution of these landforms means that throughout the Quaternary these coasts have been variably exposed to different sea level elevations which means erosion may have been concentrated at different elevations from today. Investigations of the submarine landscape of granitic coasts have however been hindered by an inability to accurately image the nearshore morphology. Only with the advent of multibeam sonar and aerial laser surveying can topographic data now be seamlessly collected from above and below sea level. This study tests the utility of these techniques and finds that very accurate measurements can be made of the nearshore thereby allowing researchers to study the submarine profile with the same accuracy as the subaerial profile. From a combination of terrestrial and marine LiDAR data with multibeam sonar data, it is found that the morphology of granite domes is virtually unaffected by erosion at sea level. It appears that evolution of these landscapes on the coast is a very slow process with modern sea level acting only to remove subaerially weathered debris. The size and orientation of the joints determines the erosional potential of the granite. Where joints are densely spaced (<2 m apart) or the bedrock is highly weathered can semi-horizontal surfaces form.
Language eng
DOI 10.1002/esp.3615
Field of Research 070402 Aquatic Ecosystem Studies and Stock Assessment
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30071756

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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