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Is change in global self-rated health associated with change in affiliation with a primary care provider? Findings from a longitudinal study from New Zealand

Jatrana, Santosh, Richardson, Ken and Crampton, Peter 2014, Is change in global self-rated health associated with change in affiliation with a primary care provider? Findings from a longitudinal study from New Zealand, Preventive medicine, vol. 64, pp. 32-36, doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.03.012.

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Title Is change in global self-rated health associated with change in affiliation with a primary care provider? Findings from a longitudinal study from New Zealand
Author(s) Jatrana, Santosh
Richardson, Ken
Crampton, Peter
Journal name Preventive medicine
Volume number 64
Start page 32
End page 36
Total pages 5
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2014-07
ISSN 1096-0260
Keyword(s) affiliation
global self-rated health (SRH)
New Zealand
primary health care
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Ethnic Groups
European Continental Ancestry Group
Family Characteristics
Female
Health Status
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Self Report
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Medicine, General & Internal
General & Internal Medicine
PUBLIC, ENVIRONMENTAL & OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH, SCI
US METROPOLITAN-AREAS
REGULAR SOURCE
INCOME INEQUALITY
MEDICAL-CARE
DETERMINANTS
DEPRIVATION
POPULATION
MORTALITY
OUTCOMES
ACCESS
Summary To investigate the association of self-rated health and affiliation with a primary care provider (PCP) in New Zealand.
Methods

We used data from a New Zealand panel study of 22,000 adults. The main exposure was self-rated health, and the main outcome measure was affiliation with a PCP. Fixed effects conditional logistic models were used to control for observed time-varying and unobserved time-invariant confounding.
Results

In any given wave, the odds of being affiliated with a PCP were higher for those in good and fair/poor health relative to those in excellent health. While affiliation for Europeans increased as reported health declined, the odds of being affiliated were lower for Māori respondents reporting very good or good health relative to those in excellent health. No significant differences in the association by age or gender were observed.
Conclusions

Our data support the hypothesis that those in poorer health are more likely to be affiliated with a PCP. Variations in affiliation for Māori could arise for several reasons, including differences in care-seeking behaviour and perceived need of care. It may also mean that the message about the benefits of primary health care is not getting through equally to all population groups.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.03.012
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
1106 Human Movement And Sports Science
1117 Public Health And Health Services
1302 Curriculum And Pedagogy
Socio Economic Objective 940204 Public Services Policy Advice and Analysis
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30071759

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Alfred Deakin Research Institute
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