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Understanding meal patterns: definitions, methodology and impact on nutrient intake and diet quality

Leech, Rebecca M., Worsley, Anthony, Timperio, Anna and McNaughton, Sarah A. 2015, Understanding meal patterns: definitions, methodology and impact on nutrient intake and diet quality, Nutrition research reviews, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 1-21, doi: 10.1017/S0954422414000262.

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Title Understanding meal patterns: definitions, methodology and impact on nutrient intake and diet quality
Author(s) Leech, Rebecca M.
Worsley, Anthony
Timperio, Anna
McNaughton, Sarah A.ORCID iD for McNaughton, Sarah A. orcid.org/0000-0001-5936-9820
Journal name Nutrition research reviews
Volume number 28
Issue number 1
Start page 1
End page 21
Total pages 21
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2015-06
ISSN 1475-2700
Keyword(s) meal patterns
diet quality
nutrient intake
diet quality indicators
Summary Traditionally, nutrition research has focused on individual nutrients, and more recently dietary patterns. However, there has been relatively little focus on dietary intake at the level of a 'meal'. The purpose of the present paper was to review the literature on adults' meal patterns, including how meal patterns have previously been defined and their associations with nutrient intakes and diet quality. For this narrative literature review, a comprehensive search of electronic databases was undertaken to identify studies in adults aged ≥  19 years that have investigated meal patterns and their association with nutrient intakes and/or diet quality. To date, different approaches have been used to define meals with little investigation of how these definitions influence the characterisation of meal patterns. This review identified thirty-four and fourteen studies that have examined associations between adults' meals patterns, nutrient intakes and diet quality, respectively. Most studies defined meals using a participant-identified approach, but varied in the additional criteria used to determine individual meals, snacks and/or eating occasions. Studies also varied in the types of meal patterns, nutrients and diet quality indicators examined. The most consistent finding was an inverse association between skipping breakfast and diet quality. No consistent association was found for other meal patterns, and little research has examined how meal timing is associated with diet quality. In conclusion, an understanding of the influence of different meal definitions on the characterisation of meal patterns will facilitate the interpretation of the existing literature, and may provide guidance on the most appropriate definitions to use.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S0954422414000262
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30071779

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.