The calibration of student judgement through self-assessment: disruptive effects of assessment patterns

Boud,D, Lawson,R and Thompson,DG 2015, The calibration of student judgement through self-assessment: disruptive effects of assessment patterns, Higher education research & development, vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 45-59, doi: 10.1080/07294360.2014.934328.

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Title The calibration of student judgement through self-assessment: disruptive effects of assessment patterns
Author(s) Boud,DORCID iD for Boud,D orcid.org/0000-0002-6883-2722
Lawson,R
Thompson,DG
Journal name Higher education research & development
Volume number 34
Issue number 1
Start page 45
End page 59
Total pages 15
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 0729-4360
1469-8366
Keyword(s) assessment
judgement
self-assessment
student learning
Summary Can extended opportunities for self-assessment over time help students develop the capacity to make better judgements about their work? Using evidence gathered through students' voluntary self-assessment of their performance with respect to assessment tasks in two different disciplines at two Australian universities, the paper focuses on the effects of sequences of units of study and the use of different types of assessment task (written, oral, analysis, and project) in the development of student judgement. Convergence between student criteria-based gradings of their own performance in units of study and those allocated by tutors was analysed to explore the calibration of students' judgement over time. First, it seeks to replicate analyses from an earlier smaller-scale study to confirm that students' judgements can be calibrated through continuing opportunities for self-assessment and feedback. Second, it extends the analysis to coherently designed sequences of units of study and explores the effects of different types of assessment. It finds that disruptive patterns of assessment within a sequence of subjects can reduce convergence between student and tutor judgements.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/07294360.2014.934328
Field of Research 130103 Higher Education
Socio Economic Objective 930101 Learner and Learning Achievement
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30071988

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Centre for Research in Assessment and Digital Learning (CRADLE)
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