The exception to the rule : Retreating ice front makes Bewick's swans Cygnus columbianus bewickii migrate slower in spring than in autumn

Nuijten,RJM, Kölzsch,A, van Gils,JA, Hoye,BJ, Oosterbeek,K, de Vries,PP, Klaassen,M and Nolet,BA 2014, The exception to the rule : Retreating ice front makes Bewick's swans Cygnus columbianus bewickii migrate slower in spring than in autumn, Journal of avian biology, vol. 45, no. 2, pp. 113-122, doi: 10.1111/j.1600-048X.2013.00287.x.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title The exception to the rule : Retreating ice front makes Bewick's swans Cygnus columbianus bewickii migrate slower in spring than in autumn
Author(s) Nuijten,RJM
Kölzsch,A
van Gils,JA
Hoye,BJ
Oosterbeek,K
de Vries,PP
Klaassen,MORCID iD for Klaassen,M orcid.org/0000-0003-3907-9599
Nolet,BA
Journal name Journal of avian biology
Volume number 45
Issue number 2
Start page 113
End page 122
Total pages 10
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2014-03
ISSN 0908-8857
1600-048X
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Ornithology
Zoology
BIRD MIGRATION
PONDWEED TUBERS
FUELING RATES
TUNDRA SWANS
WHITE SEA
SPEED
DISTANCE
TEMPERATURE
POPULATIONS
ADJUSTMENTS
Summary In the vast majority of migratory bird species studied so far, spring migration has been found to proceed faster than autumn migration. In spring, selection pressures for rapid migration are purportedly higher, and migratory conditions such as food supply, daylength, and/or wind support may be better than in autumn. In swans, however, spring migration appears to be slower than autumn migration. Based on a comparison of tundra swan Cygnus columbianus tracking data with long-term temperature data from wheather stations, it has previously been suggested that this was due to a capital breeding strategy (gathering resources for breeding during spring migration) and/or to ice cover constraining spring but not autumn migration. Here we directly test the hypothesis that Bewick's swans Cygnus columbianus bewickii follow the ice front in spring, but not in autumn, by comparing three years of GPS tracking data from individual swans with concurrent ice cover data at five important migratory stop-over sites. In general, ice constrained the swans in the middle part of spring migration, but not in the first (no ice cover was present in the first part) nor in the last part. In autumn, the swans migrated far ahead of ice formation, possibly in order to prevent being trapped by an early onset of winter. We conclude that spring migration in swans is slower than autumn migration because spring migration speed is constrained by ice cover. This restriction to spring migration speed may be more common in northerly migrating birds that rely on freshwater resources. © 2013 The Authors.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1600-048X.2013.00287.x
Field of Research 060201 Behavioural Ecology
Socio Economic Objective 960899 Flora
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Wiley-Blackwell
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30072045

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 18 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 22 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 377 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 14 Apr 2015, 12:14:53 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.