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Transfer of maternal antibodies against avian influenza virus in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos)

van Dijk, Jacintha G.B., Mateman, A. Christa and Klaassen, Marcel 2014, Transfer of maternal antibodies against avian influenza virus in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), PLoS One, vol. 9, no. 11, pp. 1-7, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0112595.

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Title Transfer of maternal antibodies against avian influenza virus in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos)
Formatted title Transfer of maternal antibodies against avian influenza virus in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos)
Author(s) van Dijk, Jacintha G.B.
Mateman, A. Christa
Klaassen, MarcelORCID iD for Klaassen, Marcel orcid.org/0000-0003-3907-9599
Journal name PLoS One
Volume number 9
Issue number 11
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher PLoS
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2014-11
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
EGG SIZE
HEMAGGLUTININ SUBTYPE
OFFSPRING IMMUNITY
A VIRUS
YOLK
TRANSMISSION
SURVIVAL
BIRDS
GULLS
SEX
Summary Maternal antibodies protect chicks from infection with pathogens early in life and may impact pathogen dynamics due to the alteration of the proportion of susceptible individuals in a population. We investigated the transfer of maternal antibodies against avian influenza virus (AIV) in a key AIV host species, the mallard (Anas platyrhynchos). Combining observations in both the field and in mallards kept in captivity, we connected maternal AIV antibody concentrations in eggs to (i) female body condition, (ii) female AIV antibody concentration, (iii) egg laying order, (iv) egg size and (v) embryo sex. We applied maternity analysis to the eggs collected in the field to account for intraspecific nest parasitism, which is reportedly high in Anseriformes, detecting parasitic eggs in one out of eight clutches. AIV antibody prevalence in free-living and captive females was respectively 48% and 56%, with 43% and 24% of the eggs receiving these antibodies maternally. In both field and captive study, maternal AIV antibody concentrations in egg yolk correlated positively with circulating AIV antibody concentrations in females. In the captive study, yolk AIV antibody concentrations correlated positively with egg laying order. Female body mass and egg size from the field and captive study, and embryos sex from the field study were not associated with maternal AIV antibody concentrations in eggs. Our study indicates that maternal AIV antibody transfer may potentially play an important role in shaping AIV infection dynamics in mallards.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0112595
Field of Research 060201 Behavioural Ecology
Socio Economic Objective 960899 Flora
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30072047

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.