Openly accessible

Migratory birds reinforce local circulation of avian influenza viruses

Verhagen, Josanne H., van Dijk, Jacintha G.B., Vuong, Oanh, Bestebroer, Theo, Lexmond, Pascal, Klaassen, Marcel and Fouchier, Ron A.M. 2014, Migratory birds reinforce local circulation of avian influenza viruses, PLoS One, vol. 9, no. 11, Article number: e112366, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0112366.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
verhagen-migratorybirds-2014.pdf Published version application/pdf 837.11KB 13

Title Migratory birds reinforce local circulation of avian influenza viruses
Author(s) Verhagen, Josanne H.
van Dijk, Jacintha G.B.
Vuong, Oanh
Bestebroer, Theo
Lexmond, Pascal
Klaassen, MarcelORCID iD for Klaassen, Marcel orcid.org/0000-0003-3907-9599
Fouchier, Ron A.M.
Journal name PLoS One
Volume number 9
Issue number 11
Season Article number: e112366
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher PLoS
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2014-11
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
A VIRUSES
WILD BIRDS
STABLE-ISOTOPES
EVOLUTION
INFECTION
SURVEILLANCE
SONGBIRDS
PATTERNS
RESIDENT
ECOLOGY
Summary Migratory and resident hosts have been hypothesized to fulfil distinct roles in infectious disease dynamics. However, the contribution of resident and migratory hosts to wildlife infectious disease epidemiology, including that of low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) in wild birds, has largely remained unstudied. During an autumn H3 LPAIV epizootic in free-living mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) - a partially migratory species - we identified resident and migratory host populations using stable hydrogen isotope analysis of flight feathers. We investigated the role of migratory and resident hosts separately in the introduction and maintenance of H3 LPAIV during the epizootic. To test this we analysed (i) H3 virus kinship, (ii) temporal patterns in H3 virus prevalence and shedding and (iii) H3-specific antibody prevalence in relation to host migratory strategy. We demonstrate that the H3 LPAIV strain causing the epizootic most likely originated from a single introduction, followed by local clonal expansion. The H3 LPAIV strain was genetically unrelated to H3 LPAIV detected both before and after the epizootic at the study site. During the LPAIV epizootic, migratory mallards were more often infected with H3 LPAIV than residents. Low titres of H3-specific antibodies were detected in only a few residents and migrants. Our results suggest that in this LPAIV epizootic, a single H3 virus was present in resident mallards prior to arrival of migratory mallards followed by a period of virus amplification, importantly associated with the influx of migratory mallards. Thus migrants are suggested to act as local amplifiers rather than the often suggested role as vectors importing novel strains from afar. Our study exemplifies that a multifaceted interdisciplinary approach offers promising opportunities to elucidate the role of migratory and resident hosts in infectious disease dynamics in wildlife.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0112366
Field of Research 060201 Behavioural Ecology
Socio Economic Objective 960899 Flora
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30072050

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 13 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 13 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 273 Abstract Views, 14 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 14 Apr 2015, 12:00:02 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.