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Working with people who have killed: The experience and attitudes of forensic mental health clinicians working with forensic patients

Harris, Derith M., Happell, Brenda and Manias, Elizabeth 2015, Working with people who have killed: The experience and attitudes of forensic mental health clinicians working with forensic patients, International journal of mental health nursing, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 130-138, doi: 10.1111/inm.12113.

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Title Working with people who have killed: The experience and attitudes of forensic mental health clinicians working with forensic patients
Author(s) Harris, Derith M.
Happell, Brenda
Manias, ElizabethORCID iD for Manias, Elizabeth orcid.org/0000-0002-3747-0087
Journal name International journal of mental health nursing
Volume number 24
Issue number 2
Start page 130
End page 138
Total pages 9
Publisher Blackwell Publishing
Place of publication Carlton, Vic
Publication date 2015-04
ISSN 1445-8330
1447-0349
Keyword(s) Attitude
Forensic mental health
Forensic psychiatry
Mental health nursing
Mental illness
Summary Forensic mental health (FMH) clinicians sometimes feel unsupported and unprepared for their work. This article explores their experiences of working in a FMH setting in Australia. The research examined the clinical context of clinicians working with forensic patients (FP), particularly those individuals who have killed while experiencing a mental illness. A qualitative, exploratory design was selected. Data were collected through focus groups and individual interviews with hospital and community-based forensic clinicians from all professional groups: psychiatric medicine, social work, psychology, mental health nursing, occupational therapy, and psychiatric service officers. The main themes identified were orientation and adjustment to FMH, training in FMH, vicarious traumatization, clinical debriefing and clinical supervision, and therapeutic relationships. Participants described being frustrated and unsupported in making the transition to working with FP and felt conflicted by the emotional response that was generated when developing therapeutic relationships. Recommendations include the development of programmes that might assist clinicians and address gaps in service delivery, such as clinical governance, targeted orientation programmes, and clinical supervision.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/inm.12113
Field of Research 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920210 Nursing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, Wiley
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30072223

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.