You are not logged in.

The effects of a course of intranasal oxytocin on social behaviors in youth diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders: A randomized controlled trial

Guastella,AJ, Gray,KM, Rinehart,NJ, Alvares,GA, Tonge,BJ, Hickie,IB, Keating,CM, Cacciotti-Saija,C and Einfeld,SL 2015, The effects of a course of intranasal oxytocin on social behaviors in youth diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders: A randomized controlled trial, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, vol. 56, no. 4, pp. 444-452, doi: 10.1111/jcpp.12305.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title The effects of a course of intranasal oxytocin on social behaviors in youth diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders: A randomized controlled trial
Author(s) Guastella,AJ
Gray,KM
Rinehart,NJORCID iD for Rinehart,NJ orcid.org/0000-0001-6109-3958
Alvares,GA
Tonge,BJ
Hickie,IB
Keating,CM
Cacciotti-Saija,C
Einfeld,SL
Journal name Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines
Volume number 56
Issue number 4
Start page 444
End page 452
Publisher Wiley
Publication date 2015-04
ISSN 0021-9630
1469-7610
Keyword(s) developmental disorder
emotion recognition
neuropeptides
placebo-controlled
Social cognition
Summary Background There is increasing interest in oxytocin as a therapeutic to treat social deficits in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of a course of oxytocin nasal spray to improve social behavior in youth with ASD. Methods In a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial across two Australian university sites between February 2009 and January 2012, 50 male participants aged between 12 and 18 years, with Autistic or Asperger's Disorder, were randomized to receive either oxytocin (n = 26) or placebo (n = 24) nasal sprays (either 18 or 24 International Units), administered twice-daily for 8 weeks. Participants were assessed at baseline, after 4- and 8-weeks of treatment, and at 3-month follow-up. Primary outcomes were change in total scores on the caregiver-completed Social Responsiveness Scale and clinician-ratings on the Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement scale. Secondary assessments included caregiver reports of repetitive and other developmental behaviors and social cognition. Clinical trial registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry www.anzctr.org.au ACTRN12609000513213. Results Participants who received oxytocin showed no benefit following treatment on primary or secondary outcomes. However, caregivers who believed their children received oxytocin reported greater improvements compared to caregivers who believed their child received placebo. Nasal sprays were well tolerated and there was no evidence of increased side effects resulting from oxytocin administration. Conclusions This is the first evaluation of the efficacy for a course of oxytocin treatment for youth with ASD. Although results did not suggest clinical efficacy, further research is needed to explore alternative delivery methods, earlier age of intervention, and the influence of caregiver expectation on treatment response.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/jcpp.12305
Field of Research 179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
Copyright notice ©2015, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30072227

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 59 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 69 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 26 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 14 Apr 2015, 10:13:29 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.