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Identifying the African wintering grounds of hybrid flycatchers using a multi-isotope (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N) assignment approach

Veen, Thor, Hjernquist, Mårten B., Van Wilgenburg, Steven L., Hobson, Keith A., Folmer, Eelke, Font, Laura and Klaassen, Marcel 2014, Identifying the African wintering grounds of hybrid flycatchers using a multi-isotope (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N) assignment approach, PLoS One, vol. 9, no. 5, Article number: e98075, pp. 1-7, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0098075.

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Title Identifying the African wintering grounds of hybrid flycatchers using a multi-isotope (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N) assignment approach
Author(s) Veen, Thor
Hjernquist, Mårten B.
Van Wilgenburg, Steven L.
Hobson, Keith A.
Folmer, Eelke
Font, Laura
Klaassen, MarcelORCID iD for Klaassen, Marcel orcid.org/0000-0003-3907-9599
Journal name PLoS One
Volume number 9
Issue number 5
Season Article number: e98075
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher PLoS
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2014
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Africa South of the Sahara
Animal Migration
Animals
Carbon Isotopes
Deuterium
Feathers
Nitrogen Isotopes
Seasons
Songbirds
Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
LIGHT-LEVEL GEOLOCATORS
MIGRATORY BEHAVIOR
PHYLLOSCOPUS-TROCHILUS
SYLVIA-ATRICAPILLA
STABLE HYDROGEN
BIRDS
EVOLUTION
NAVIGATION
DIRECTION
Summary Migratory routes and wintering grounds can have important fitness consequences, which can lead to divergent selection on populations or taxa differing in their migratory itinerary. Collared (Ficedula albicollis) and pied (F. hypoleuca) flycatchers breeding in Europe and wintering in different sub-Saharan regions have distinct migratory routes on the eastern and western sides of the Sahara desert, respectively. In an earlier paper, we showed that hybrids of the two species did not incur reduced winter survival, which would be expected if their migration strategy had been a mix of the parent species' strategies potentially resulting in an intermediate route crossing the Sahara desert to different wintering grounds. Previously, we compared isotope ratios and found no significant difference in stable-nitrogen isotope ratios (δ15N) in winter-grown feathers between the parental species and hybrids, but stable-carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) in hybrids significantly clustered only with those of pied flycatchers. We followed up on these findings and additionally analyzed the same feathers for stable-hydrogen isotope ratios (δ2H) and conducted spatially explicit multi-isotope assignment analyses. The assignment results overlapped with presumed wintering ranges of the two species, highlighting the efficacy of the method. In contrast to earlier findings, hybrids clustered with both parental species, though most strongly with pied flycatcher.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0098075
Field of Research 060201 Behavioural Ecology
Socio Economic Objective 960899 Flora
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30072255

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.