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Deficient cognitive control fuels children's exuberant false allegations.

Poole,DA, Dickinson,JJ, Brubacher,SP, Liberty,AE and Kaake,AM 2014, Deficient cognitive control fuels children's exuberant false allegations., Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, vol. 118, pp. 101-109, doi: 10.1016/j.jecp.2013.08.013.

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Title Deficient cognitive control fuels children's exuberant false allegations.
Author(s) Poole,DA
Dickinson,JJ
Brubacher,SP
Liberty,AE
Kaake,AM
Journal name Journal of Experimental Child Psychology
Volume number 118
Start page 101
End page 109
Total pages 9
Publisher Academic Press
Place of publication MO, United States
Publication date 2014-02
ISSN 1096-0457
Keyword(s) Body diagrams
Children
Cognitive control
Confabulation
Eyewitness testimony
False allegations
Age Factors
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual
Child, Preschool
Cognition
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Psychology, Child
Sex Factors
Theory of Mind
Summary In eyewitness studies as in actual investigations, a minority of children generate numerous false (and sometimes incredulous) allegations. To explore the characteristics of these children, we reinterviewed and administered a battery of tasks to 61 children (ages 4-9 years) who had previously participated in an eyewitness study where a man broke a "germ rule" twice when he tried to touch them. Performance on utilization, response conflict (Luria tapping), and theory of mind tasks predicted the number of false reports of touching (with age and time since the event controlled) and correctly classified 90.16% of the children as typical witnesses or exuberant (more than 3) false reporters. Results of a factor analysis pointed to a common process underlying performance on these tasks that accounted for 49% of the variability in false reports. Relations between task performance and testimony confirmed that the mechanisms underlying occasional intrusions are different from those that drive persistent confabulation and that deficient cognitive control fuels young children's exuberant false reports.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.jecp.2013.08.013
Field of Research 170102 Developmental Psychology and Ageing
170104 Forensic Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, Academic Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30072256

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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