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Outdoor fungi and child asthma health service attendances

Tham,R, Dharmage,SC, Taylor,PE, Katelaris,CH, Vicendese,D, Abramson,MJ and Erbas,B 2014, Outdoor fungi and child asthma health service attendances, Pediatric allergy and immunology, vol. 25, no. 5, pp. 439-449, doi: 10.1111/pai.12257.

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Title Outdoor fungi and child asthma health service attendances
Author(s) Tham,R
Dharmage,SC
Taylor,PEORCID iD for Taylor,PE orcid.org/0000-0002-4204-1893
Katelaris,CH
Vicendese,D
Abramson,MJ
Erbas,B
Journal name Pediatric allergy and immunology
Volume number 25
Issue number 5
Start page 439
End page 449
Total pages 11
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Place of publication West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publication date 2014-08
ISSN 1399-3038
Keyword(s) aeroallergen
asthma
child
emergency department
fungi
health services
hospital
mould
systematic review
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Allergy
Immunology
Pediatrics
AIR-POLLUTION
HOSPITAL ADMISSIONS
RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION
EMERGENCY VISITS
GLOBAL BURDEN
UNITED-STATES
SPORE COUNTS
POLLEN
AEROALLERGENS
ALTERNARIA
Summary Asthma is a significant global public health issue. Severe asthma exacerbations can be triggered by environmental factors and require medical care from health services. Although it is known that fungal exposure may lead to allergic sensitization, little is understood about its impact on asthma exacerbations. This review aims to examine whether outdoor fungi play a significant role in child asthma exacerbations. Systematic search of seven electronic databases and hand searching for peer-reviewed studies published in English, up to 31 August 2013. Inclusion criteria were study population aged <18 yr, diagnosis of asthma, attended a health service; outdoor fungi exposure was reported. Quality and risk of bias assessments were conducted. Due to significant heterogeneity, meta-analysis was not conducted. Of the 1896 articles found, 15 were eligible. Findings were not consistent, possibly due to methodological variations in exposure classifications, statistical methods and inclusion of confounders. Cross-sectional studies found no or weak associations. All but one time series studies indicated an association that varied between fungal species. Increasing evidence indicates that asthmatic children are susceptible to asthma exacerbations when exposed to outdoor fungal spores. There is limited understanding of the contributions of different fungal species. Research is needed to investigate interactions of outdoor fungi with pollen, air pollutants and respiratory viruses.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/pai.12257
Field of Research 110701 Allergy
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Wiley-Blackwell
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30072381

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