Exposure to As(III) and As(V) changes the Ca²⁺-activation properties of the two major fibre types from the chelae of the freshwater crustacean Cherax destructor

Williams, Gemma, Snow, Elizabeth T and West, Jan M 2014, Exposure to As(III) and As(V) changes the Ca²⁺-activation properties of the two major fibre types from the chelae of the freshwater crustacean Cherax destructor, Aquatic toxicology, vol. 155, pp. 119-128, doi: 10.1016/j.aquatox.2014.06.013.

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Title Exposure to As(III) and As(V) changes the Ca²⁺-activation properties of the two major fibre types from the chelae of the freshwater crustacean Cherax destructor
Author(s) Williams, Gemma
Snow, Elizabeth T
West, Jan MORCID iD for West, Jan M orcid.org/0000-0003-1112-6082
Journal name Aquatic toxicology
Volume number 155
Start page 119
End page 128
Total pages 10
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2014-10
ISSN 1879-1514
Keyword(s) As(III)
As(V)
Ca(2+)-activation
Crustacean muscle
Skinned fibre
Animals
Arsenic
Calcium
Crustacea
Fresh Water
Muscle Contraction
Muscles
Water Pollutants, Chemical
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Marine & Freshwater Biology
Toxicology
Ca2+-activation
MYOSIN HEAVY-CHAIN
CONTRACTILE ACTIVATION PROPERTIES
LOBSTER HOMARUS-AMERICANUS
SKINNED MUSCLE-FIBERS
AMINO-ACID-SEQUENCES
TROPONIN-C
MYOFIBRILLAR PROTEINS
SLOW-TWITCH
PROCAMBARUS-CLARKII
FORCE RESPONSES
Summary Arsenic is a known carcinogen found in the soil in gold mining regions at concentrations thousands of times greater than gold. Mining releases arsenic into the environment and surrounding water bodies. The main chemical forms of arsenic found in the environment are inorganic arsenite (As(III)) and arsenate (As(V)). Yabbies (Cherax destructor) accumulate arsenic at levels comparable to those in the sediment of their environment but the effect on their physiological function is not known. The effects of arsenic exposure (10 ppm sodium arsenite, AsNaO2 - 5.7 ppm As(III)) and 10 ppm arsenic acid, Na2HAsO4·7H2O - 2.6 ppm As(V)) for 40 days on the contractile function of the two major fibre types from the chelae were determined. After exposure, individual fibres were isolated from the chela, "skinned" (membrane removed) and attached to the force recording apparatus. Contraction was induced in solutions containing increasing [Ca(2+)] until a maximum Ca(2+)-activation was obtained. Submaximal force responses were plotted as a percentage of the maximum Ca(2+)-activated force. As(V) exposure resulted in lower levels of calcium required for activation than As(III) indicating an increased sensitivity to Ca(2+) after long term exposure to arsenate compared to arsenite. Myosin heavy chain and tropomyosin content in individual fibres was also decreased as a result of arsenic exposure. Single fibres exposed to As(V) produced significantly more force than muscle fibres from control animals. Long-term exposure of yabbies to arsenic alters the contractile function of the two major fibre types in the chelae.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.aquatox.2014.06.013
Field of Research 060806 Animal Physiological Ecology
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30072392

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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