You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Context sensitivity in action decreases along the autism spectrum: a predictive processing perspective

Palmer, Colin J., Paton, Bryan, Kirkovski, Melissa, Enticott, Peter G. and Hohwy, Jakob 2015, Context sensitivity in action decreases along the autism spectrum: a predictive processing perspective, Proceedings. Biological sciences, vol. 282, no. 1802, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1098/rspb.2014.1557.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
enticott-contextsensitivity-post-2015.pdf Author's post print application/pdf 6.42MB 7

Title Context sensitivity in action decreases along the autism spectrum: a predictive processing perspective
Author(s) Palmer, Colin J.
Paton, Bryan
Kirkovski, MelissaORCID iD for Kirkovski, Melissa orcid.org/0000-0003-3395-8525
Enticott, Peter G.ORCID iD for Enticott, Peter G. orcid.org/0000-0002-6638-951X
Hohwy, Jakob
Journal name Proceedings. Biological sciences
Volume number 282
Issue number 1802
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher The Royal Society
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015-01-28
ISSN 1471-2954
Keyword(s) autism
autistic traits
movement
predictive coding
rubber-hand illusion
Summary Recent predictive processing accounts of perception and action point towards a key challenge for the nervous system in dynamically optimizing the balance between incoming sensory information and existing expectations regarding the state of the environment. Here, we report differences in the influence of the preceding sensory context on motor function, varying with respect to both clinical and subclinical features of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Reach-to-grasp movements were recorded subsequent to an inactive period in which illusory ownership of a prosthetic limb was induced. We analysed the sub-components of reach trajectories derived using a minimum-jerk fitting procedure. Non-clinical adults low in autistic features showed disrupted movement execution following the illusion compared to a control condition. By contrast, individuals higher in autistic features (both those with ASD and non-clinical individuals high in autistic traits) showed reduced sensitivity to the presence of the illusion in their reaching movements while still exhibiting the typical perceptual effects of the illusion. Clinical individuals were distinct from non-clinical individuals scoring high in autistic features, however, in the early stages of movement. These results suggest that the influence of high-level representations of the environment differs between individuals, contributing to clinical and subclinical differences in motor performance that manifest in a contextual manner. As high-level representations of context help to explain fluctuations in sensory input over relatively longer time scales, more circumscribed sensitivity to prior or contextual information in autistic sensory processing could contribute more generally to reduced social comprehension, sensory impairments and a stronger desire for predictability and routine.
Language eng
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2014.1557
Field of Research 170101 Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology)
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Royal Society
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30072463

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 22 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 18 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 158 Abstract Views, 8 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Sun, 19 Apr 2015, 11:38:32 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.