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Lower limb progressive resistance training improves leg strength but not gait speed or balance in Parkinson's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Tillman, Alex, Muthalib, Makii, Hendy, Ashlee M., Johnson, Liam G., Rantalainen, Timo, Kidgell, Dawson J., Enticott, Peter G. and Teo,Wei-Peng 2015, Lower limb progressive resistance training improves leg strength but not gait speed or balance in Parkinson's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis., Frontiers in aging neuroscience, vol. 7, Article no: 40, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.3389/fnagi.2015.00040.

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Title Lower limb progressive resistance training improves leg strength but not gait speed or balance in Parkinson's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
Author(s) Tillman, Alex
Muthalib, Makii
Hendy, Ashlee M.
Johnson, Liam G.
Rantalainen, TimoORCID iD for Rantalainen, Timo orcid.org/0000-0001-6977-4782
Kidgell, Dawson J.
Enticott, Peter G.ORCID iD for Enticott, Peter G. orcid.org/0000-0002-6638-951X
Teo,Wei-PengORCID iD for Teo,Wei-Peng orcid.org/0000-0003-3929-9778
Journal name Frontiers in aging neuroscience
Volume number 7
Season Article no: 40
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Frontiers Research Foundation
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2015-03-24
ISSN 1663-4365
Keyword(s) Parkinson’s disease
balance
gait speed
leg strength
progressive resistance training
Summary The use of progressive resistance training (PRT) to improve gait and balance in people with Parkinson's disease (PD) is an emerging area of interest. However, the main effects of PRT on lower limb functions such as gait, balance, and leg strength in people with PD remain unclear. Therefore, the aim of the meta-analysis is to evaluate the evidence surrounding the use of PRT to improve gait and balance in people with PD. Five electronic databases, from inception to December 2014, were searched to identify the relevant studies. Data extraction was performed by two independent reviewers and methodological quality was assessed using the PEDro scale. Standardized mean differences (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of fixed and random effects models were used to calculate the effect sizes between experimental and control groups and I (2) statistics were used to determine levels of heterogeneity. In total, seven studies were identified consisting of 172 participants (experimental n = 84; control n = 88). The pooled results showed a moderate but significant effect of PRT on leg strength (SMD 1.42, 95% CI 0.464-2.376); however, no significant effects were observed for gait speed (SMD 0.418, 95% CI -0.219 to 1.055). No significant effects were observed for balance measures included in this review. In conclusion, our results showed no discernable effect of PRT on gait and balance measures, although this is likely due to the lack of studies available. It may be suggested that PRT be performed in conjunction with balance or task-specific functional training to elicit greater lower limb functional benefits in people with PD.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fnagi.2015.00040
Field of Research 170101 Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology)
Socio Economic Objective 920403 Disability and Functional Capacity
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Frontiers Research Foundation
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30072465

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.