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Witness recall across repeated interviews in a case of repeated abuse.

Brubacher,SP and La Rooy,D 2014, Witness recall across repeated interviews in a case of repeated abuse., Child Abuse and Neglect, vol. 38, no. 2, pp. 202-211, doi: 10.1016/j.chiabu.2013.06.010.

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Title Witness recall across repeated interviews in a case of repeated abuse.
Author(s) Brubacher,SP
La Rooy,D
Journal name Child Abuse and Neglect
Volume number 38
Issue number 2
Start page 202
End page 211
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication England
Publication date 2014-02
ISSN 1873-7757
Keyword(s) Case study
Child sexual abuse
Forensic interviews
Particularization
Repeated events
Scripts
Summary In this illustrative case study we examine the three forensic interviews of a girl who experienced repeated sexual abuse from ages 7 to 11. She disclosed the abuse after watching a serialized television show that contained a storyline similar to her own experience. This triggered an investigation that ended in successful prosecution of the offender. Because this case involved abuse that was repeated on a weekly basis for 4 years we thus investigated the degree to which the child's narrative reflected specific episodes or generic accounts, and both the interviewer's and child's attempts to elicit and provide, respectively, specific details across the 3 interviews collected in a 1 month period. Across the 3 interviews, the child's account was largely generic, yet on a number of occasions she provided details specific to individual incidents (episodic leads) that could have been probed further. As predicted: earlier interviews were characterized more by episodic than generic prompts and the reverse was true for the third interview; the child often responded using the same style of language (episodic or generic) as the interviewer; and open questions yielded narrative information. We discuss the importance of adopting children's words to specify occurrences, and the potential benefits of permitting generic recall in investigative interviews on children's ability to provide episodic leads. Despite the fact that the testimony was characterized by generic information about what usually happened, rather than specific episodic details about individual occurrences, this case resulted in successful prosecution.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.chiabu.2013.06.010
Field of Research 170104 Forensic Psychology
170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30072545

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.