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"Because she's one who listens": children discuss disclosure recipients in forensic interviews

Malloy, Lindsay C., Brubacher, Sonja P. and Lamb, Michael E. 2013, "Because she's one who listens": children discuss disclosure recipients in forensic interviews, Child maltreatment, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 245-251, doi: 10.1177/1077559513497250.

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Title "Because she's one who listens": children discuss disclosure recipients in forensic interviews
Author(s) Malloy, Lindsay C.
Brubacher, Sonja P.
Lamb, Michael E.
Journal name Child maltreatment
Volume number 18
Issue number 4
Start page 245
End page 251
Total pages 7
Publisher Sage Publications
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2013-11
ISSN 1077-5595
1552-6119
Keyword(s) disclosure
interviewing children
child sexual abuse
children’s eyewitness testimony
Summary The current study examined investigative interviews using the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Investigative Interview Protocol with 204, five- to thirteen-year-old suspected victims of child sexual abuse. The analyses focused on who children told, who they wanted (or did not want) to tell and why, their expectations about being believed, and other general motivations for disclosure. Children's spontaneous reports as well as their responses to interviewer questions about disclosure were explored. Results demonstrated that the majority of children discussed disclosure recipients in their interviews, with 78 children (38%) explaining their disclosures. Only 15 children (7%) mentioned expectations about whether recipients would believe their disclosures. There were no differences between the types of information elicited by interviewers and those provided spontaneously, suggesting that, when interviewed in an open-ended, facilitative manner, children themselves produce informative details about their disclosure histories. Results have practical implications for professionals who interview children about sexual abuse.
Language eng
DOI 10.1177/1077559513497250
Field of Research 170104 Forensic Psychology
1607 Social Work
1701 Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2013, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30072564

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.