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Prevalence of beak and feather disease virus in wild Platycercus elegans: comparison of three tissue types using a probe-based real-time qPCR test

Eastwood, Justin R., Berg, Mathew L., Spolding, Briana, Buchanan, Katherine L., Bennett, Andrew T. D. and Walder, Ken 2015, Prevalence of beak and feather disease virus in wild Platycercus elegans: comparison of three tissue types using a probe-based real-time qPCR test, Australian journal of zoology, vol. 63, no. 1, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1071/ZO14052.

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Title Prevalence of beak and feather disease virus in wild Platycercus elegans: comparison of three tissue types using a probe-based real-time qPCR test
Author(s) Eastwood, Justin R.
Berg, Mathew L.ORCID iD for Berg, Mathew L. orcid.org/0000-0002-5774-3089
Spolding, Briana
Buchanan, Katherine L.ORCID iD for Buchanan, Katherine L. orcid.org/0000-0002-6648-5819
Bennett, Andrew T. D.ORCID iD for Bennett, Andrew T. D. orcid.org/0000-0001-8512-2805
Walder, KenORCID iD for Walder, Ken orcid.org/0000-0002-6758-4763
Journal name Australian journal of zoology
Volume number 63
Issue number 1
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Place of publication Clayton, Vic.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 0004-959X
1446-5698
Keyword(s) Australian birds
conservation
parrots
wildlife management
Summary The detection of avian viruses in wild populations has considerable conservation implications. For DNA-based studies, feathers may be a convenient sample type for virus screening and are, therefore, an increasingly common technique. This is despite recent concerns about DNA quality, ethics, and a paucity of data comparing the reliability and sensitivity of feather sampling to other common sample types such as blood. Alternatively, skeletal muscle tissue may offer a convenient sample to collect from dead birds, which may reveal viraemia. Here, we describe a probe-based quantitative real-time PCR for the relative quantification of beak and feather disease virus (BFDV), a pathogen of serious conservation concern for parrots globally. We used this method to test for BFDV in wild crimson rosellas (Platycercus elegans), and compared three different sample types. We detected BFDV in samples from 29 out of 84 individuals (34.5%). However, feather samples provided discordant results concerning virus presence when compared with muscle tissue and blood, and estimates of viral load varied somewhat between different sample types. This study provides evidence for widespread infection of BFDV in wild crimson rosellas, but highlights the importance of sample type when generating and interpreting qualitative and quantitative avian virus data.
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/ZO14052
Field of Research 069999 Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, CSIRO
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30072629

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Created: Thu, 23 Apr 2015, 09:53:04 EST

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