Stakeholders' perceptions of the benefit of introducing an Australian intermediary system for vulnerable witnesses

Powell, Martine B., Bowden, Phoebe and Mattison, Michelle 2015, Stakeholders' perceptions of the benefit of introducing an Australian intermediary system for vulnerable witnesses, Australian & New Zealand journal of criminology, vol. 48, no. 4, pp. 498-512, doi: 10.1177/0004865814543391.

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Title Stakeholders' perceptions of the benefit of introducing an Australian intermediary system for vulnerable witnesses
Author(s) Powell, Martine B.ORCID iD for Powell, Martine B. orcid.org/0000-0001-5092-1308
Bowden, Phoebe
Mattison, Michelle
Journal name Australian & New Zealand journal of criminology
Volume number 48
Issue number 4
Start page 498
End page 512
Total pages 15
Publisher Sage Publications
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 0004-8658
1837-9273
Keyword(s) Intermediaries
intermediary scheme
investigative interviewing
special measures
vulnerable
witnesses
Summary Vulnerable witnesses (e.g. children and adults with communication impairment) face many barriers to testifying and achieving justice when participating in the criminal justice system. To date, reforms have been implemented in Australia to address these, yet the barriers remain. Several other countries have implemented an intermediary scheme, whereby an independent third party assists vulnerable witnesses to understand the questions and processes encountered during interviews and trials, and helps witnesses to be understood. This study provides a qualitative analysis of stakeholders' (N = 25 professionals) perceptions regarding the potential benefits of implementing an intermediary scheme in Australia. While all participants demonstrated an open-minded attitude to new reform in this area, their perspectives did not support the introduction of an intermediary scheme at this time. Stakeholders highlighted the need for improved use and effectiveness of current measures, and expressed concern about adding further complication to the system.
Language eng
DOI 10.1177/0004865814543391
Field of Research 170104 Forensic Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30072667

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
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