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Reflections on being a first generation self-advocate: belonging, social connections, and doing things that matter

Frawley, Patsie and Bigby, Christine 2015, Reflections on being a first generation self-advocate: belonging, social connections, and doing things that matter, Journal of intellectual and developmental disability, vol. 40, no. 3, pp. 254-264.

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Title Reflections on being a first generation self-advocate: belonging, social connections, and doing things that matter
Author(s) Frawley, PatsieORCID iD for Frawley, Patsie orcid.org/0000-0002-7643-4935
Bigby, Christine
Journal name Journal of intellectual and developmental disability
Volume number 40
Issue number 3
Start page 254
End page 264
Total pages 11
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1366-8250
1469-9532
Keyword(s) intellectual disability
self-advocacy
social inclusion
Summary Background Despite good policy intentions, people with intellectual disability continue to be socially excluded. Social geographers suggest the potential of self-authored spaces as catalysts for social inclusion. One such space, self-advocacy, is commonly perceived as part of a political movement for social change rather than a vehicle for social inclusion of its members. This paper investigated what involvement in self-advocacy has meant to long-term members of a self-advocacy group in Victoria, Australia. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with 12 self-advocates about their reflections on involvement in the group. These data together with the commentary of 5 self-advocates during interviews with 18 self-advocacy supporters about their recollections of involvement in the group were transcribed and analysed thematically. Findings Through their involvement in self-advocacy, members of the group had gained a sense of belonging, social connections, and purposeful occupation, which included paid project work, lobbying, and organisational leadership and management. Conclusions This study suggests that self-advocacy groups can be places that foster social inclusion, potentially offering “membership” of an exclusive group, a wider social movement and of mainstream society.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920403 Disability and Functional Capacity
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30072763

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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