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Assessing and managing breast cancer risk: Clinicians' current practice and future needs

Collins,IM, Steel,E, Mann,GB, Emery,JD, Bickerstaffe,A, Trainer,A, Butow,P, Pirotta,M, Antoniou,AC, Cuzick,J, Hopper,J, Phillips,KA and Keogh,LA 2014, Assessing and managing breast cancer risk: Clinicians' current practice and future needs, The Breast, vol. 23, pp. 644-650, doi: 10.1016/j.breast.2014.06.014.

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Title Assessing and managing breast cancer risk: Clinicians' current practice and future needs
Author(s) Collins,IMORCID iD for Collins,IM orcid.org/0000-0001-6936-0942
Steel,E
Mann,GB
Emery,JD
Bickerstaffe,A
Trainer,A
Butow,P
Pirotta,M
Antoniou,AC
Cuzick,J
Hopper,J
Phillips,KA
Keogh,LA
Journal name The Breast
Volume number 23
Start page 644
End page 650
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2014
ISSN 1532-3080
Keyword(s) Breast cancer BRCA Risk reduction Clinical decision support Needs assessment
BRCA
Breast cancer
Clinical decision support
Needs assessment
Risk reduction
Summary Decision support tools for the assessment and management of breast cancer risk may improve uptake of prevention strategies. End-user input in the design of such tools is critical to increase clinical use. Before developing such a computerized tool, we examined clinicians' practice and future needs. Twelve breast surgeons, 12 primary care physicians and 5 practice nurses participated in 4 focus groups. These were recorded, coded, and analyzed to identify key themes. Participants identified difficulties assessing risk, including a lack of available tools to standardize practice. Most expressed confidence identifying women at potentially high risk, but not moderate risk. Participants felt a tool could especially reassure young women at average risk. Desirable features included: evidence-based, accessible (e.g. web-based), and displaying absolute (not relative) risks in multiple formats. The potential to create anxiety was a concern. Development of future tools should address these issues to optimize translation of knowledge into clinical practice.
Notes Collins, Ian M Steel, Emma Mann, G Bruce Emery, Jon D Bickerstaffe, Adrian Trainer, Alison Butow, Phyllis Pirotta, Marie Antoniou, Antonis C Cuzick, Jack Hopper, John Phillips, Kelly-Anne Keogh, Louise A ENG Edinburgh, Scotland 2014/07/08 06:00 Breast. 2014 Jul 3. pii: S0960-9776(14)00127-1. doi: 10.1016/j.breast.2014.06.014. Decision support tools for the assessment and management of breast cancer risk may improve uptake of prevention strategies. End-user input in the design of such tools is critical to increase clinical use. Before developing such a computerized tool, we examined clinicians' practice and future needs. Twelve breast surgeons, 12 primary care physicians and 5 practice nurses participated in 4 focus groups. These were recorded, coded, and analyzed to identify key themes. Participants identified difficulties assessing risk, including a lack of available tools to standardize practice. Most expressed confidence identifying women at potentially high risk, but not moderate risk. Participants felt a tool could especially reassure young women at average risk. Desirable features included: evidence-based, accessible (e.g. web-based), and displaying absolute (not relative) risks in multiple formats. The potential to create anxiety was a concern. Development of future tools should address these issues to optimize translation of knowledge into clinical practice.
DOI 10.1016/j.breast.2014.06.014
Field of Research 111299 Oncology and Carcinogenesis not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920102 Cancer and Related Disorders
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Elsevier
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30072792

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.