You are not logged in.

Transitioning to routine breast cancer risk assessment and management in primary care: what can we learn from cardiovascular disease?

Phillips, Kelly-Anne, Steel, Emma J., Collins, Ian, Emery, Jon, Pirotta, Marie, Mann, G. Bruce, Butow, Phyllis, Hopper, John L., Trainer, Alison, Moreton, Jane, Antoniou, Antonis C., Cuzick, Jack and Keogh, Louise 2015, Transitioning to routine breast cancer risk assessment and management in primary care: what can we learn from cardiovascular disease?, Australian journal of primary health, vol. 22, pp. 255-261, doi: 10.1071/PY14156.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Transitioning to routine breast cancer risk assessment and management in primary care: what can we learn from cardiovascular disease?
Author(s) Phillips, Kelly-Anne
Steel, Emma J.
Collins, IanORCID iD for Collins, Ian orcid.org/0000-0001-6936-0942
Emery, Jon
Pirotta, Marie
Mann, G. Bruce
Butow, Phyllis
Hopper, John L.
Trainer, Alison
Moreton, Jane
Antoniou, Antonis C.
Cuzick, Jack
Keogh, Louise
Journal name Australian journal of primary health
Volume number 22
Start page 255
End page 261
Total pages 7
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Place of publication Clayton, Vic.
Publication date 2015-02-24
ISSN 1836-7399
Keyword(s) decision support
risk management
screening
tamoxifen
Summary To capitalise on advances in breast cancer prevention, all women would need to have their breast cancer risk formally assessed. With ~85% of Australians attending primary care clinics at least once a year, primary care is an opportune location for formal breast cancer risk assessment and management. This study assessed the current practice and needs of primary care clinicians regarding assessment and management of breast cancer risk. Two facilitated focus group discussions were held with 17 primary care clinicians (12 GPs and 5 practice nurses (PNs)) as part of a larger needs assessment. Primary care clinicians viewed assessment and management of cardiovascular risk as an intrinsic, expected part of their role, often triggered by practice software prompts and facilitated by use of an online tool. Conversely, assessment of breast cancer risk was not routine and was generally patient- (not clinician-) initiated, and risk management (apart from routine screening) was considered outside the primary care domain. Clinicians suggested that routine assessment and management of breast cancer risk might be achieved if it were widely endorsed as within the remit of primary care and supported by an online risk-assessment and decision aid tool that was integrated into primary care software. This study identified several key issues that would need to be addressed to facilitate the transition to routine assessment and management of breast cancer risk in primary care, based largely on the model used for cardiovascular disease.
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/PY14156
Field of Research 111299 Oncology and Carcinogenesis not elsewhere classified
11 Medical And Health Sciences
16 Studies In Human Society
17 Psychology And Cognitive Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 920102 Cancer and Related Disorders
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, CSIRO Publishing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30072799

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
Quality and Patient Safety Research
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 75 Abstract Views, 3 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 29 Apr 2015, 15:13:23 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.