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Ibuprofen treatment blunts early translational signaling responses in human skeletal muscle following resistance exercise.

Markworth,JF, Vella,LD, Figueiredo,VC and Cameron-Smith,D 2014, Ibuprofen treatment blunts early translational signaling responses in human skeletal muscle following resistance exercise., Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 117, no. 1, pp. 20-28, doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.01299.2013.

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Title Ibuprofen treatment blunts early translational signaling responses in human skeletal muscle following resistance exercise.
Author(s) Markworth,JF
Vella,LD
Figueiredo,VC
Cameron-Smith,D
Journal name Journal of Applied Physiology
Volume number 117
Issue number 1
Start page 20
End page 28
Publisher American Physiological Society
Place of publication United States
Publication date 2014
ISSN 1522-1601
Keyword(s) ERK
NSAID
inflammation
mTOR
prostaglandins
protein synthesis
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Physiology
Sport Sciences
NONSTEROIDAL ANTIINFLAMMATORY DRUGS
PROTEIN S6 PHOSPHORYLATION
CAP-DEPENDENT TRANSLATION
MESSENGER-RNA TRANSLATION
KINASE PATHWAY
INDUCED HYPERTROPHY
TUBEROUS SCLEROSIS
MAMMALIAN TARGET
INDUCED INCREASE
COX-2 PATHWAY
Summary Cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 pathway-derived prostaglandins (PGs) have been implicated in adaptive muscle responses to exercise, but the role of PGs in contraction-induced muscle signaling has not been determined. We investigated the effect of inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 activities with the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen on human muscle signaling responses to resistance exercise. Subjects orally ingested 1,200 mg ibuprofen (or placebo control) in three 400-mg doses administered ∼30 min before and ∼6 h and ∼12 h following a bout of unaccustomed resistance exercise (80% one repetition maximum). Muscle biopsies were obtained at rest (preexercise), immediately postexercise (0 h), 3 h postexercise, and at 24 h of recovery. In the placebo (PLA) group, phosphorylation of ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204), ribosomal protein S6 kinase (RSK, Ser380), mitogen-activated kinase 1 (Mnk1, Thr197/202), and p70S6 kinase (p70S6K, Thr421/Ser424) increased at both 0 and 3 h postexercise, with delayed elevation of phospho (p)-p70S6K (Thr389) and p-rpS6 (Ser235/S36 and Ser240/244) at 3 h postexercise. Only p-ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) remained significantly elevated in the 24-h postexercise biopsy. Ibuprofen treatment prevented sustained elevation of MEK-ERK signaling at 3 h (p-ERK1/2, p-RSK, p-Mnk1, p-p70S6K Thr421/Ser424) and 24 h (p-ERK1/2) postexercise, and this was associated with suppressed phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (Ser235/236 and Ser240/244). Early contraction-induced p-Akt (Ser473) and p-p70S6K (Thr389) were not influenced by ibuprofen, but p-p70S6K (Thr389) remained elevated 24 h postexercise only in those receiving ibuprofen treatment. Early muscle signaling responses to resistance exercise are, in part, ibuprofen sensitive, suggesting that PGs are important signaling molecules during early postexercise recovery.
Language eng
DOI 10.1152/japplphysiol.01299.2013
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, American Physiological Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30072839

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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